Scott DesJarlais

GOP Moderates Face Health Care Heat
‘Many of our members who were opposed to the bill are probably still opposed’

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on April 26, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY McPHERSON and ERIN MERSHON, CQ ROLL CALL

Conservative Republicans put their moderate colleagues in the health care hot seat Wednesday.

Conservatives Begin to Accept Health Care Bill, Moderate Votes Unclear
‘Whether it’s this vehicle or another vehicle, it will be addressed.’

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., arrives for a hastily called House Republican caucus meeting after Speaker Ryan canceled the vote on the American Health Care Act of 2017 on Friday, March 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY McPHERSON and ERIN MERSHON

UPDATED 1:50 p.m. 04/26/17

House GOP Leaders Tweak Health Care Proposal
Action before recess won’t make bill ready for a vote

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has announced an amendment to the GOP’s health care bill that would create a high-risk pool for people with pre-existing conditions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders seeking to change the narrative on the health care talks announced plans to tweak their proposal on Thursday before members leave for a two-week recess, a move they touted as “progress.”

But they acknowledged it does not make the legislation ready for a vote.

Amash, Freedom Caucus Say Health Care ‘Deal’ Reports are False
Comes after some HFC members met with Pence and Priebus

House Freedom Caucus member Rep. Justin Amash, R-Michigan, shot down reports of a deal with the White House to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Justin Amash and the House Freedom Caucus say talks of a deal with the White House on tweaks to legislation that would repeal the 2010 health care law are premature.

Several HFC members suggested after a Monday meeting with Trump administration officials, including Vice President Mike Pence and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, that they would see a legislative outline of some of the administration’s proposed changes to their health care package on Tuesday.

Freedom Caucus Isn’t Backing Down After Trump Threat
Conservatives say they’re up for any challenge from the right

House Freedom Caucus member Trent Franks said if President Donald Trump wanted to find someone to challenge him from the right in 2018, he was welcome to try. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

If President Donald Trump’s intention was to intimidate House Freedom Caucus members with his assertion on Twitter that “we must fight them” in 2018, it didn’t work.

“If somebody can get to the right of me in the primary, God bless him,” Freedom Caucus member Trent Franks said.

Roll Call’s 2017 March Madness Bracket
Meehan, Villanova defending title

Every year, Roll Call matches members of Congress with the field in the NCAA men’s college basketball championship bracket.

Word on the Hill: It’s Recess
Your social calendar for the week

While members are back home, staffers are still in D.C. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Welcome back from the long weekend and happy recess.

How has the 115th Congress affected you so far? We found out in a survey that staffers are sleepier than the were in the last one, and now we want to hear anecdotes about how 2017 is treating you.

Scott DesJarlais Is House’s Quietest Member
Tennessee Republican spoke only once on House floor during 114th Congress

Tennessee Rep. Scott DesJarlais said he does his talking in committee meetings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Mum’s the word for Rep. Scott DesJarlais, at least on the House floor. 

The Tennessee Republican, who represents the Volunteer State’s 4th District, only spoke from the House floor on one day during the 114th Congress, according to C-SPAN, earning him the title of quietest congressman. 

House Members Squeezed in Last-Minute Spending on Mail Franking, Advertising Before Elections
Restrictions on pre-election constituent communication meant members spent more in a shorter period of time

Maine Rep. Bruce Poliquin was the biggest spender on a mailing practice known as franking during the third quarter of 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House lawmakers spent millions of dollars on nonpolitical, constituent communications — on the taxpayers’ dime — in the weeks before a “blackout” deadline before November’s elections, according to a Roll Call analysis of receipts recently published by the chamber’s chief administrative officer.

Members of Congress can send this type of mail, a perk known as “franking” that dates back to the Colonial era, by using their signatures instead of stamps. It’s meant to communicate information about a lawmakers’ legislative duties and constituent services, according to the Committee on House Administration. 

Scandalized Tennessee Representative Survives Competitive Primary
Aggressive campaign from young challenger couldn't sink Scott DesJarlais

Rep. Scott Desjarlais, R-Tenn., talks with reporters after a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol, May 17, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Tennessee Republican Scott DesJarlais survived his primary in the 4th District Thursday night against former Mitt Romney aide Grant Starrett.  

Starrett tweeted that he called DesJarlais to concede shortly before The Associated Press called the race in the congressman's favor. DesJarlais won 52 percent of the vote to Starrett's 43.