Sheila Jackson Lee

Sewell Staffer Says Ways and Means Void Has Been Filled
Sashrina Thomas also worked for Stephanie Tubbs Jones, last African-American woman on panel

Shashrina Thomas has worked for Rep. Terri A. Sewell since 2014. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Shashrina Thomas is the bridge between the first and second African-American women to serve on the House Ways and Means Committee.

It had been nine years since an African-American woman served on the panel until Alabama Democrat Terri A. Sewell joined this year with the help of Thomas, her chief of staff.

Word on the Hill: National Wine Day
Dusty Baker on the Hill and Dana Rohrabacher in a sling

Celebrate National Wine Day before the weekend. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

You may be pleasantly surprised to hear about a very special, perhaps unknown, holiday. Today is National Wine Day.

It’s nearly Friday, which means it’s almost recess, so pick up a bottle of wine on your way home from work to celebrate.

Democrats Cheer Centrist Victory in France, Republicans Mostly Silent
Many saw French election as extension of centrist vs. right wing ideological fight in the U.S.

French President-elect Emmanuel Macron waves to the crowd on Monday as he attends a ceremony to mark the Western allies’ victory in Europe in World War II with outgoing President Francois Hollande. (Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

France’s presidential election drew more attention in the U.S. than normal because many saw it as an extension of the ideological fight between centrism and the far right that characterized the presidential contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

French voters elected centrist Emmanuel Macron president, resoundingly rejecting far-right white nationalist Marine Le Pen, 66-34 percent.

Lee, Thompson and Fudge on Former Rep. Brown’s Witness List
Former congresswoman’s trial scheduled to begin April 24

Former Rep. Corrine Brown, D-Fla., is charged with using funds from a non-profit on herself. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Reps. Bennie Thompson, Marcia Fudge and Sheila Jackson Lee are potential witnesses in the corruption case of former Florida Rep. Corrine Brown. 

An attorney for Brown listed Thompson, D-Miss., Fudge, D-Ohio, and Lee, D-Texas, are on the witness list for Brown’s corruption trial, which begins with jury selection on April 24, the Florida Times-Union reported.

Photos of the Week: Pence Casts Historic Vote, Gorsuch to the Hill and Warren Reads King
The week of Feb. 6 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Protesters gather in Upper Senate Park at the Capitol on Monday to call on senators to reject Secretary of Education nominee Betsy DeVos. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS CQ Roll Call

A busy week in the Capitol was marked by several historic moments, including the first time a vice president has cast a tiebreaker vote on a cabinet nomination. The Senate, in protest of several of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees, was in session for more than two days. The late night session made headlines when Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren was silenced as she read a 1986 letter from Coretta Scott King about Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Democrats Take Protests to High Court
Rally against Trump travel ban picks up where weekend left off

From left, Reps. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland, Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas, Terri A. Sewell of Alabama, Gwen Moore of Wisconsin and Val Demings of Florida join other members of the House and Senate in front of the Supreme Court on Monday to voice opposition to President Donald Trump’s executive order barring refugees, and nationals from certain countries from entering the U.S. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats continued their protests of President Donald Trump’s recent executive order on immigration on Monday evening, marching down the East Front Capitol steps holding candles and singing “This Land Is Your Land,” heading to the Supreme Court to rally against the executive action.

“This cannot be the America that we know,” said California Rep. Judy Chu, one of several lawmakers who spoke during the demonstration.

Word on the Hill: How Will You Judge Trump’s Inauguration Speech
‘I’m also very much of a germophobe, by the way. Believe me’

President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration is almost a week away. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We’re almost a week away to President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration and on Wednesday, he gave his first news conference since the election.

The Quote.com blog analyzed presidential inaugural addresses and ranked them by reading level. The analysis was part of a study of top American speeches, on eight different linguistic scales to figure out the complexity of their syntaxes. Of the inaugural addresses, the analysis found that President George H.W. Bushgave the easiest speech in 1989 while President John Adams gave the most difficult in 1797.

Trump Election Is Made Official Over Scattered Objections
House Democrats object to Electoral College results, but senators remain mum

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, top right, reacts as Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., top left, puts down an objection by a Democratic House member to the Electoral College count, during a joint session of Congress to tally the electoral ballots for U.S. president and vice president on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

For Donald Trump, all that’s left is the oath of office — and, likely, many tweets.

House Democratic efforts to challenge the electoral process failed Friday when no senators joined the objections as Congress certified Trump’s Electoral College victory.

Scott DesJarlais Is House’s Quietest Member
Tennessee Republican spoke only once on House floor during 114th Congress

Tennessee Rep. Scott DesJarlais said he does his talking in committee meetings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Mum’s the word for Rep. Scott DesJarlais, at least on the House floor. 

The Tennessee Republican, who represents the Volunteer State’s 4th District, only spoke from the House floor on one day during the 114th Congress, according to C-SPAN, earning him the title of quietest congressman. 

As Funding Government Stalled, Fundraising for Congress Soared
Perpetual brinksmanship, perpetual campaigning the new normal

New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte arrives at Charlie Palmer Steak restaurant for a fundraising event, one of dozens held by members of Congress in recent weeks. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As members of Congress postured and blamed each other for a budget impasse that threatened to shut down the government, the Charlie Palmer Steak restaurant was a happening place for backroom fundraising.

In separate dining rooms that were just steps from each other, three members of Congress — two House Democrats from safe districts and a Republican senator in a competitive race — entertained contributors who’d paid as much as $2,500 for lunch.