Sherrod Brown

3 Takeaways: Experts say ‘Beto’ could beat Trump — if he can get that far
‘You pronounced it incorrectly: It’s Robert Francis,’ WH spox says dismissively of O’Rourke

Beto O’Rourke joins Willie Nelson on stage in Austin during his failed bid for Senate in 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump has mostly remained silent about the ever-growing list of candidates who have joined the Democratic race for the party’s 2020 nomination to face him. But that’s not the case with Beto O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman who threw his hat in the ring late Wednesday.

Unlike California Sen. Kamala Harris or former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper or Washington Gov. Jay Inslee or Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, the politician known colloquially as “Beto” seems to have gotten under the president’s skin — or at least gotten Trump’s attention.

Trump shifts expectations on North Korea nuclear deal, again
‘We’ll let you know in about a year,’ POTUS says of reported missile test facility rebuild

President Donald Trump again expressed frustration with North Korea over alleged work on a missile test facility, violating a promise he says Kim Jong Un made during their first summit. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Thursday again downgraded expectations for a nuclear disarmament deal with North Korea, saying it could be a year before U.S. officials know if Kim Jong Un is serious about shutting down his weapons programs.

White House officials have been scrambling to respond to a media report that Kim is rebuilding a missile testing facility, a move that contradicts his pledge to hold off on nuclear and missile tests while engaged with the Trump administration about giving up that program and his nuclear weapons.

Sen. Sherrod Brown says he isn’t running for president
Ohio Democrat says he will continue ‘calling out Donald Trump and his phony populism’

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks with reporters in the Capitol after the Senate vote to reopen the government on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown won’t be joining several of his Democratic Senate colleagues who are seeking the White House in 2020. 

“The best place for me to continue fighting for the people of Ohio and for the dignity of all workers across the country is in the U.S. Senate,” Brown said in a statement Thursday. “So, I will not run for President in 2020.”

A half-century after Selma, the ‘black friend’ defense is going strong
Too many Americans, like the Oscar-winning ‘Green Book,’ think racism can be solved by making an ‘exceptional’ black friend — as long as the family doesn’t move in next door

Rep. John Lewis stands on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala. The specter of partisan rancor — fueled in part by Mark Meadows’ performance at the Cohen hearings — hangs over this year’s commemoration of Bloody Sunday, Curtis writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — On a “Meet the Press” appearance a few weeks ago, Ohio Democrat and maybe presidential hopeful Sen. Sherrod Brown was commenting on that slam-bang start to Black History Month, Virginia officials in blackface, when he said, “This country hasn’t dealt well with issues of race. We have a president who’s a racist.” That led host Chuck Todd to ask Brown if he believed Donald Trump was a racist “in his heart,” to which Brown answered, “Well, I don’t know what ‘in his heart’ means.”

Exactly.

Democrats vow Judge Chad Readler will be 2020 issue
Murray and Schumer among Democrats blasting his role in targeting health care law

The Senate confirmed Chad A. Readler, President Trump’s nominee to be U.S. Circuit Judge for the 6th Circuit, on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats say they will remember the Wednesday afternoon vote to confirm Chad A. Readler, one of President Donald Trump’s most contentious judicial nominees.

The 52-47 vote to install Readler on the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Ohio could easily be lumped in with many other Trump choices pushed through the Senate by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

Two speeches, two audiences, same Pence pitch to blue-collar voters
Gallup: With big base turnout, approval below 50 percent in key states ‘may be enough’

Vice President Mike Pence arrives at the Capitol. In speeches this week, he has talked up blue-collar economic data. Those voters again will be key in the 2020 presidential race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Vice President Mike Pence hit many of the same notes Tuesday and Wednesday, though his speeches were calibrated for different audiences: manufacturing bigwigs one day and Latino business honchos the next. Both days he had a message for a voting bloc key to deciding if he and President Donald Trump win a second term.

Pence spoke Wednesday to the Latino Coalition’s annual legislative summit at the Park Hyatt hotel in Washington, driving home the need for “a legal immigration system that works, that’s built on opportunity for all and on merit — and that all begins with border security.” He also spoke about the administration’s contention that Latino unemployment rates are at an all-time low, while calling Venezuelan strongman Nicolas Maduro “a dictator with no legitimate claim to power.”

His father delivered Luke Perry. Now Sherrod Brown is mourning him
Perry, 52, died after a stoke. He starred in the popular teen dramas ‘Beverly Hills, 90210’ and ‘Riverdale’

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks with reporters in the Capitol after the Senate vote to reopen the government on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Sherrod Brown mourned actor Luke Perry on Monday, it wasn’t as a typical fan. The senator’s father was the one who brought the heartthrob into the world.

“His father was my doctor for the first 12 years of my life ... he taught me about patience and compassion. He taught me how to sew myself up,” Perry said at the rally.

Can a senator be nominated and win the White House?
History has not been kind, but times are changing

Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Cory Booker of New Jersey are just two of the several Democratic senators making White House bids. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The abundance of sitting senators running for president seems to confirm the old joke that a senator looking into a mirror sees a future president. But it doesn’t say much about whether the Senate is a good springboard to the White House. Historically, it has not been.

Sitting senators have underperformed in contests for presidential nominations, with only three of them moving directly to the White House — Warren Harding, John Kennedy and Barack Obama.

Sanders first to get non-home state congressional endorsement
Ro Khanna has expressed support for a Sanders presidential run since 2017

Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., conducts a news conference in the Capitol to introduce a legislative package that would lower prescription drug prices in the U.S. on Jan. 10, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Bernie Sanders is the first 2020 candidate to pick up an endorsement from a member of Congress who is not from their home state.

Ro Khanna, D-Calif., announced Thursday that he is backing the Vermont independent to be the next president. The endorsement is not a surprising one — Khana tweeted in July of 2017 that Sanders should “absolutely run again in 2020!”

Bernie Sanders says he’s running for president again
Independent Vermont senator won 23 primaries and caucuses in 2016 before conceding to Hillary Clinton

Sen. Bernie Sanders talks with reporters in the Capitol after the Senate passed the government funding bill on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., confirmed Tuesday he will seek the Democratic nomination to the presidency in 2020 to Vermont Public Radio.

A formal announcement is expected later today, VPR News reported.