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Opinion: Figure It Out, Mr. President
Congress isn’t built to just do what Donald Trump says

President Donald Trump must choose if he wants to be a hardcore anti-establishment president or a smart deal-maker, Allen writes. (Scott Olson/Getty Images) (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

If it were up to President Donald Trump — and a lot of Americans — Congress might not exist. After all, the legislative branch is the kind of inert obstacle that a disruptor business executive doesn’t have to contend with as he innovates and improvises in the private sector. 

Alas, for Trump, the Founding Fathers believed that wild swings in direction could tear a fragile nation asunder. They made it difficult for a president — any president — to rewrite public policy, push the nation to war or enter into treaties.

Trump Signs Action Expediting Foreign Steel Prices Investigation
National security concerns cited

U.S. President Donald Trump departs the White House on his way to a waiting Marine One helicopter April 18, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump spoke a Snap-On tool factory during the trip. (McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Thursday, citing national security concerns, signed an executive action expediting a Commerce Department probe examining whether manipulated foreign steel prices could hinder his envisioned military buildup.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told reporters that the investigation was formally launched on Wednesday evening over concerns that the U.S. steel industry would be unable to keep up with demand of the Trump administration’s planned military buildup. Contracts for major Pentagon weapons programs typically are accompanied by stipulations that combat gear must be built using American steel.

In Wisconsin, Trump Returns to ‘America First’ Message
Schumer slams Trump for ‘empty’ actions on jobs, trade

President Donald Trump signs an executive order to try to bring jobs back to American workers and revamp the H-1B visa guest worker program during a visit to the headquarters of tool manufacturer Snap-On on April 18, 2017 in Kenosha, Wisconsin. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump returned to his nationalist “America first” message on Tuesday after spending most of the previous 12 days focused on Syria and North Korea.

Trump, until he began speaking at a Snap-On Tools factory in Wisconsin, had appeared in recent days to be drifting a bit from the populist message that helped him win manufacturing states like the one he visited Tuesday, as well as Michigan, Ohio and others. But after touring the plant, he was back at it, hailing “American workers” and threatening countries that “steal” their jobs.

The Snapchat Senators
Daines, Murphy, Booker and McCain talk about the social mobile app

Montana Sen. Steve Daines Snapchats in Statuary Hall before President Donald Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Snapchat was initially established in 2011 and within the last year or so, a few senators have jumped on the social messaging app popular with millennials.

The lawmakers usually send multimedia messages, or snaps, themselves — as opposed to having their staffers do it — and they get pretty creative with what they send to followers.

Word on the Hill: Love Is in the Air
Puppies and friends of national service

On Valentine’s Day 2005, California Sen. Barbara Boxer received about 4,000 roses in her Hart building office from supporters. Boxer donated the flowers to injured military members at Walter Reed Naval Hospital in Bethesda Maryland. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Snap a photograph and tweet @HeardontheHill or email HOH@rollcall.com if you see anyone around Capitol Hill receiving a Valentine’s Day gift.

Former Oregon GOP Candidate Was on Food Stamps
Mike Callahan now running for state GOP Chair

 

Mike Callahan, a two-time former Republican candidate for senate in Oregon, reportedly was on food stamps shortly after his divorce.

Opinion: The Romney Agonistes
 

Mitt Romney speaks to reporters after dining with President-elect Donald Trump at Jean Georges restaurant, November 29, 2016 in New York City. President-elect Donald Trump and his transition team are in the process of filling cabinet and other high level positions for the new administration. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Poor, gullible Mitt Romney. He thought maybe, just maybe, Donald Trump wouldn’t focus his transition on settling petty scores. He fooled himself into believing the Donald might consider him a diplomat rather than a comic prop. He got so wrapped up in the possibilities of the moment that he let photographers snap shots of him at a dinner with Trump, not realizing that, without doubt, he was the main course.

The Rules of Girl Club Are Simple
Democratic women senators say they wear ‘high heels for dancing our way to victory’

U.S. Senate women appear on stage for their presentation at the Democratic National Convention in July. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democratic women of the Senate have Hillary Clinton in their Girl Club.

In a video released by EMILY’s List on Thursday, female senators speak about the rules of their club and why you should vote for Clinton on Tuesday.

Sources: White House Angling for ‘Clean‘ Renewal of Iran Sanctions
Administration has stopped short of veto threat as House vote looms

Secretary of State John Kerry, left, takes a seat across from Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in January in Vienna, before a meeting about the implementation of a deal focused on Iran’s nuclear program. (Courtesy State Department via Flickr)

The House plans to vote to renew expiring sanctions on Iran without adding provisions the White House would likely find objectionable, and sources say President Barack Obama is likely to let such a “clean” bill become law.

At issue is the Iran Sanctions Act of 1996, which targets the nation’s energy sector and is due to expire Dec. 31. The White House says the president and Treasury Department already possess the sanctions-issuing authorities that the law grants. But Obama likely would not veto a “clean” renewal because administration officials have concluded it would not violate the terms of the nuclear deal the U.S. and other world powers brokered with Tehran last year, according to a source with knowledge of the White House’s deliberations.