Social Security

In Ralph Norman, Trump Gets a Strong Ally
Incoming South Carolina congressman gives president an A-plus

South Carolina Rep.-elect Ralph Norman won on his second attempt for the 5th District seat. (Courtesy Ralph Norman for Congress)

Republican Ralph Norman, a developer of hotels, shopping centers, and retail stores, won a House seat 11 years after his first unsuccessful bid for the same South Carolina seat in 2006.

In Tuesday’s 5th District special election to replace former Rep. Mick Mulvaney, who resigned from the House to become head of the Office of Management and Budget, Norman defeated Democrat Archie Parnell, a former Goldman Sachs executive and tax lawyer by an unexpectedly close 51 percent to 48 percent margin.

Word on the Hill: USS Gabrielle Giffords
Your social calendar for the week

Former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords poses with husband Mark Kelly at the christening of her namesake ship in 2015. (Courtesy Giffords via Facebook)

Former Rep. Gabreille Giffords, D-Ariz., made history this weekend when the U.S. Navy launched a combat ship named after her.

Giffords, who survived a shooting assassination attempt in Tucson, Ariz., in 2011, is the first living woman since first lady Martha Washington to have a Navy warship named after her.

Conservatives Huddle at White House on Debt Limit Increase
Unified message sought after mixed signals from Treasury and OMB

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin have been divided on a debt limit increase . (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Lobbyists Don’t Get Business Boom With Trump
Clients have been hiring lobbyists at a reduced rate compared to 2009

BY SEAN MCMINN and KATE ACKLEY

With a unified Republican government in Washington, lobbyists hoped that 2017 would offer a long-awaited opportunity to push big proposals through Congress — but records do not indicate any large uptick in clients during the early months of the Trump administration.

Trump, Tax Writers Find Doubts on Plan for Social Security IDs
Concerns over identity theft alarm even some Republicans

Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt is concerned about the proposals to expand the use of Social Security numbers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump and top congressional tax writers say they want to prevent undocumented workers from claiming tax breaks they aren’t entitled to by tightening up the standards, but a proposal to expand the use of Social Security numbers is finding resistance among lawmakers, including Republicans who are worried about identify theft.

Trump’s fiscal 2018 budget request would expand on language in the 1996 tax overhaul that required tax filers claiming the earned income tax credit to include a qualifying child’s name and Social Security number on the return. The administration said it would tighten the mandate to require such filers to also show they have the right to work.

A Chaotic Start to a Town Hall-Filled Recess Week
Conflicting accounts over whether Issa hid from constituents on his roof

Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J., leaving a House Republican Conference meeting earlier in May. He held a town hall this Tuesday during the Memorial Day recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Tuesday of Memorial Day recess was a busy one for members of Congress interacting with constituents. It could be just the start, considering many more public meetings are planned for later this week or over the weekend.

For instance, Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J., distanced himself from Trump in front of angry town hall attendees demanding he do just that. While across the country in California, Republican Rep. Darrell Issa may have hidden from his protesting constituents on top of his district office roof. A little farther north in California, Trump supporters disrupted an immigration town hall with Democratic Rep. Lou Correa, resulting in the arrest of one man and the detention of two women.

Trump Budget’s Chilly Reception Will Be Nothing New
Congress routinely rebuffed Obama budgets too

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney, center, and GPO Director Davita Vance-Cooks, right, reviewed production of the fiscal 208 budget proposal at the Government Publishing Office’s plant on North Capitol Street last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s budget request finally gets its full release Tuesday morning, but the stories of its inevitable rejection on Capitol Hill could have been written weeks ago.

There has been ample bipartisan skepticism of the proposed cuts to domestic programs coming out of Trump’s budget office for fiscal 2018, but overall, the reaction and follow through on it will not likely be much different than it ever was under President Barack Obama.

Army Reserve Lawyer to Challenge Peters in California
Omar Qudrat prosecuted terrorist cases

Omar Qudrat has not yet filed, but he has launched a website making his case in his challenge to Rep. Scott Peters of California. (omarqudrat.com)

Army Reserve lawyer Omar Qudrat is expected to announce his candidacy against California Rep. Scott Peters.

On his website, Qudrat, who has yet to officially announced, highlights his work as a civilian attorney in Afghanistan and as a reserve officer in the Army’s Judge Advocate’s General Corps. He advocates clearing the regulatory way for small businesses to add jobs, to fix the country’s “broken education system” and 

Trump Wants $800 Billion, 10-Year Cut in Entitlement Programs
Programs include Medicaid and Social Security Disability Insurance

Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney speaks to the media about President Donald Trump's budget during a May 2 briefing at the White House. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

White House officials are crafting a fiscal 2018 budget proposal for President Donald Trump that aims to wipe out the deficit through a combination of robust economic growth, steep cuts in certain means-tested entitlement programs and other savings.

Trump would aim to balance the federal budget within 10 years. His plan relies on Congress passing a comprehensive tax overhaul and other policies, such as deregulation. The administration believes these approaches will jump-start the economy, causing economic growth to ramp up to 3 percent in the coming decade, people with knowledge of the plan said.

Progressives’ ‘People's Budget’ Becomes ‘Roadmap for the Resistance’
Yearly budget calls for big jobs and infrastructure spending, tax hikes for the rich

From left, Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., and Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., unveil the Progressive Caucus' "budget deal principles" outside the Capitol in 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With the subtitle “A Roadmap for the Resistance,” the Congressional Progressive Caucus’ “People's Budget,” isn't shy about its purpose in the Trump Era.

As Rep. Barbara Lee summarized it: “In stark contrast to President Trump’s cruel poverty budget, our progressive proposal is a plan for resistance and a roadmap to a safer, healthier and more prosperous America for all.”