Speaker of the House

Taxes, Immigration Bigger Tests for Ryan Speakership Than Fiscal Deal
Conservatives concerned about how speaker will handle DACA

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s leadership will be tested in upcoming debates over taxes and immigration, potentially determining whether he remains the House’s top Republican. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s leadership capabilities are back in the spotlight after September’s fiscal crises were quickly resolved last week without any wins for conservative policies. But that deal is unlikely to define his speakership the way upcoming legislative battles on taxes and immigration will.

Whether the 10-term Wisconsin Republican remains speaker — either by his or the House GOP’s choosing — may depend on his ability to deliver legislation in those areas that can both appease his largely conservative conference and get through the more moderate Senate to President Donald Trump’s desk.

Ryan On House Dress Code: Time to Modernize
 

The Capitol’s Dress Code, Explained
 

Capitol Ink | Spring Training

Capitol Ink | Respell and Replace

Pence: Repeal and Replace Obamacare ‘First Order of Business’

Vice President-elect Mike Pence joined Speaker Paul D. Ryan for a GOP leadership news briefing Wednesday, telling reporters that working with Congress to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will be the incoming administration’s “first order of business.” See the video for highlights from Pence and Ryan’s remarks.

Paul Ryan's Primary Opponent Now Challenging Him for Speaker
Paul Nehlen announces bid for speakership after 68-point primary loss

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan trounced his Republican primary foe in August. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryantrounced his Republican primary opponent Paul Nehlen by a 68-point margin in August in Wisconsin's 1st District, but that defeat isn’t stopping Nehlen from challenging Ryan again. 

This time Nehlen is vying with Ryan for nothing less than the speaker’s gavel. The speaker of the House does not have to be a sitting member of Congress, though a nonmember has never been elected to that position. 

Boehner's Office Has Spent $100K Since Retirement
Former speaker keeps space on Hill, allowed by House protocol

John A. Boehner, whose last day as speaker was Oct. 29, 2015, has said he would vote for Donald Trump in November. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Speaker John A. Boehner may be busy commenting on the state of politics while far away from Washington, but the Ohio Republican hasn’t completely closed up shop on Capitol Hill.  

The speaker’s post-retirement office spent nearly $100,000 from the time he left Congress last fall through the end of March, according to data from the Chief Administrative Officer of the House .