Steve King

Steve King’s Facebook Page Mocks Parkland Survivors
Emma Gonzalez a pawn for “liberal media’s gun-grabbing agenda,” Iowa Republican says

The Facebook page for Iowa Rep. Steve King’s campaign mocked survivors of the Parkland, Fla., shooting during Saturday’s march for tighter gun laws. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Steve King’s Facebook page mocked survivors of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, as they led a march in Washington over the weekend to call for action on gun violence.

The Iowa Republican’s campaign page in one image singled out student Emma Gonzalez, who is Cuban-American.

Members of Both Parties Criticize Trump’s Vulgar Immigration Remark
After White House initially doesn’t deny accounts, Trump tweets early Friday that he didn’t say it

President Donald Trump early Friday said that he didn’t call Haiti and African countries “shithole countries” despite multiple media reports of accounts from lawmakers who were in a meeting about immigration policy. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

Members of both parties roundly criticized President Donald Trump after the Washington Post reported he called Haiti and African countries “shithole countries.”

The White House did not initially deny that Trump made the remarks in a bipartisan meeting about immigration.

Blackburn Announces $2 Million Haul
Has $4.62 in cash on hand

Reps. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., and Steve King, R-Iowa, are seen outside a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Marsha Blackburn is set to report she raised $2 million since she announced her candidacy for Tennessee’s Senate seat. 

Blackburn’s campaign also announced that the average donation for her campaign was $341. 

Lawmakers Make New Year’s Resolutions
Resolutions focus on legislating rather than personal goals

The House is back, and members are ready to work on their resolutions for the new year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate is back and the House will return next week after regrouping over the winter recess and preparing to tackle another tough year ahead.

Between midterms and a long legislative agenda, lawmakers have a lot to figure outSo it’s no wonder that their New Year’s resolutions revolve around policy issues and the election, instead of typical goals such as getting healthy or spending time with family.

King Slams Senators Critical of Moore as Unhelpful to Trump
Moore allegedly had sexual contact with a 14-year-old girl when he was 32

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, signaled support for Roy Moore in a tweet Thursday. The Alabama Senate candidate has been accused of sexual advances on a 14-year-old girl when he was 32. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Steve King signaled support for Roy Moore in a tweet late Thursday, saying the senators who were distancing themselves from the Alabama GOP Senate candidate’s campaign were the ones “who won’t or can’t help move [President Donald Trump’s] agenda.”

The Washington Post published a story Thursday citing four women who said Moore pursued them when they were between the ages of 14 and 18, between 1979 and 1981, when Moore worked as a district attorney. One woman said she was 14 years old when Moore removed her clothes and attempted to have her touch his genitals.

Podcast: Trump's Immigration Reversal Risks GOP Revolt
The Week Ahead, Episode 70

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) (L) makes a point to President Donald Trump in the Oval Office. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

CQ immigration editor Catalina Camia explains why President Trump and Democrats are working on a deal to help 800,000 young, undocumented immigrants stay in the country, and why that angers many of Trump's biggest Republican supporters.

 

Rank-and-File Lawmakers Not Feeling It on Grand Immigration Deal
Pairing DACA replacement with border security seen as a bad idea

House Democratic Caucus Vice Chairwoman Linda T. Sánchez says the so-called DREAM Act must be part of an immigration deal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated Friday 1:42 p.m. | President Donald Trump and congressional leaders see the most likely legislative path to replacing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program as pairing it with border security. But rank-and-file members of both parties think that’s a bad idea.

“We’re going to get ourselves in a quagmire if we allow there to be a linkage because of such disputes and debates here among the hard-line immigration crew about what should be linked,” Vermont Democratic Rep. Peter Welch said, adding that there were members for whom there could never be “enough security.”

Border Security Takes Center Stage in Debate Over 'Dreamers'

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., are working on an immigration deal that will include security measures as well as a path to legal status for undocumented immigrants.(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Now that President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders in Congress have agreed to pursue a deal that would boost border enforcement in exchange for legal status for young undocumented immigrants, the focus is shifting to what security measures the package could include.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said following a Wednesday night meeting with the president that they had agreed to table the administration’s request for money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, a nonstarter for Democrats from the beginning.

Campaigns Aren’t Equipped to Vet Donors
Contributions from white supremacists have slipped through in the past

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s presidential campaign donated to charity money it received from a white supremacist leader in 2015. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As the past week has reaffirmed, most congressional candidates don’t want to be associated with white supremacists.

But when it comes to campaign donations, candidates have little control over who supports them. It’s easy enough for politicians to donate to charity or refund contributions from controversial sources. The hard part is finding them.

House to Take Up Immigration Enforcement Bills
No Democratic support expected

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., arrives for the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday, May 2, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

For the first time since Donald Trump took office, the Republican-led House is expected to vote this week on two immigration enforcement bills — but it’s unclear whether they will reach the president who pledged to get tough on undocumented immigrants. 

The bills, introduced Thursday by House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, R-Va., are stand-alone versions of provisions included in a more comprehensive enforcement measure approved by Goodlatte’s committee in May.