Supreme Court

Supreme Court Nominee Gorsuch’s Hearings to Begin March 20
The judge will face lawmakers on March 21

Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch looks on as Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, speaks to reporters following their meeting in the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley announced Thursday that the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch will begin March 20.

Grassley's office indicated in a statement that the opening statements will take place on Monday, March 20, and Gorsuch will face the committee the following day. The hearings are expected to last three to four days and include testimony from outside experts.

Trump Travel Ban Crashes Texas Wedding Plans
Texas native with Iranian roots presses lawmakers on executive order

Shervin Taheran is concerned that some of her relatives from Iran would be unable to attend her April wedding in Texas if President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration is reinstated. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump has repeatedly said his approach to preventing terrorist attacks on U.S. soil won’t always be tidy. That’s especially true when it affects things like the already delicate task of compiling a wedding guest list. Just ask Shervin Taheran. 

If reinstated by the judicial branch, Trump’s travel ban may prevent many family members and friends from entering the United States to celebrate personal milestones with their loved ones.

Wisconsin’s Sean Duffy Will Forgo Senate Bid
Other potential candidates had been waiting on congressman’s decision

Rep. Sean Duffy announced he’s passing on a challenge to Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Update 9:35 a.m. Feb. 16 with Duffy announcement

Wisconsin Rep. Sean P. Duffy announced Thursday he will pass on a run for Senate in 2018.

For the GOP, a Dangerous Gamble on the All-Important Town Hall
Old-school constituent connections work best, but the anger is proving tough to withstand

Police escort California Rep. Tom McClintock through a town-hall audience in Roseville, California, last Saturday. (Randall Benton/The Sacramento Bee via AP)

Consider 10 and 19 as two more figures that help illustrate the risky congressional Republican strategies of passivity, defensiveness and avoidance during the first month of the Trump administration.

Ten is the total number of GOP lawmakers who have town hall meetings scheduled next week, the longest period Congress will be back home since the inauguration.  

White House Puts GOP in Awkward Position
Flynn fallout, security considerations keep dominating news

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wanted to talk about Cabinet nominations on Tuesday. But most of the questions at his press availability were about the latest scandals coming from the White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s domination of the news, whether due to the resignation of national security adviser Michael Flynn or the spectacle of the president discussing national security at his Mar-a-Lago resort’s dining room, is putting Republican leaders in an awkward position.

“Look, I — I — you’ll have to ask those — the White House those kinds of questions,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday at his traditional media availability after the Republicans’ policy lunch. 

Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch Copies and Pastes
Responses from his appellate judge confirmation process reappear

In his response to a Senate Judiciary Committee questionnaire, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch has listed his most significant cases, including a few that Democrats will point to as troubling signs about his judicial philosophy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judge Neil Gorsuch sailed through the Senate’s judicial confirmation process in 2006, and that already has helped him fill out key paperwork now that lawmakers are scrutinizing his legal career again as a Supreme Court nominee. 

Gorsuch, 49, has turned in a Senate Judiciary Committee questionnaire with some portions apparently copied and pasted from a similar questionnaire from a decade ago, when the Senate confirmed him on a voice vote to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit.

House to Take First Step to Overturn D.C. Assisted Suicide Law
Local groups plan to protest latest salvo against home rule

House Oversight Chairman Jason Chaffetz has taken an aggressive stance on reviewing D.C. laws and budgets. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A House committee will take the first official step Monday evening to overturn a new Washington, D.C., assisted suicide law, raising concerns locally that a Republican-controlled Congress will be emboldened to interfere with city government under President Donald Trump.

Actually overturning the so-called Death With Dignity Act would require an improbable series of events. After the vote on the disapproval resolution at the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, the measure would have to pass floor votes in both the House and the Senate president before Feb. 17. That’s according to a timeline set out by the city’s Home Rule Act.

Future Muddied in Legal Fight Over Trump Travel Ban
White House mulls scrapping executive order and starting anew

Protesters gather in front of the Supreme Court on Jan. 30 to voice opposition to President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Rules That Stopped Elizabeth Warren Are Waiting for Donald Trump, Too
Senate norms have never been more important in our democracy

Under Senate rules, President Donald Trump’s proposals will have to get through the chamber based on the merits of his policies, not the volume of his arguments, Murphy writes. Senators are seen here at the president’s inauguration last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rule 19 had its close-up this week, didn’t it? To be specific, Section 3 of Rule 19, did, when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell informed Sen. Elizabeth Warren that she had “impugned the motives and conduct” of her fellow senator, Jeff Sessions, when she read a letter that Coretta Scott King had written about him many years ago.

When Warren was told, “The senator shall take her seat,” she took the Coretta Scott King letter, marched a few feet off the Senate floor, and took a different seat in front of a Facebook Live feed that went out to millions. The standoff launched a battle cry for any woman who has ever felt marginalized, belittled or silenced — which, by the way, is nearly all of us. A thousand hashtags bloomed. #SheWasWarned #ShePersisted #LetLizSpeak. You get the picture.

Trump Calls Court Ruling on Muslim Travel Order ‘Disgraceful’
President fires off tweet based on Lawfare analysis minutes after cable show discusses the blog

President Trump delivers remarks on Feb. 1 in the Oval Office. On Friday morning, he called a federal court ruling against his Muslim travel ban "disgraceful." (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump, on just his 21st day in office, continued his feud with the federal judiciary, bluntly blasting an appellate court’s refusal to revive his immigration order that temporarily bans from the United States people from some Muslim-majority countries.

The new president called the decision “disgraceful” in a tweet sent at 8:15 a.m. Friday from his personal account, about 45 minutes before his official schedule listed him as due in the Oval Office for his daily intelligence briefing.