Tammy Baldwin

Wisconsin’s Sean Duffy Will Forgo Senate Bid
Other potential candidates had been waiting on congressman’s decision

Rep. Sean Duffy announced he’s passing on a challenge to Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Update 9:35 a.m. Feb. 16 with Duffy announcement

Wisconsin Rep. Sean P. Duffy announced Thursday he will pass on a run for Senate in 2018.

Word on the Hill: Chocolate Time
D.C. wants to be resilient and a new record in the Senate

A new survey finds that 94 percent of Americans want candy or chocolate for Valentine’s Day. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Friday, finally. And it’s time to buy some chocolate.

Valentine’s Day is on Tuesday and chocolate is what Americans want most for the holiday, according to a survey by the National Confectioners Association.

Right Wing Group Attempts to Draft Sheriff Clarke in Wisconsin
Another draft-Clarke group attacked Baldwin for her sexuality

A pro-President Donald Trump group is trying to draft Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke to run against Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An outside group is trying to draft Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke to challenge Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis.

In an email to supporters, the Committee to Defend the President, said it was trying to solicit 100,000 signatures within 48 hours to convince Clarke to run.

Republicans Target Baldwin on Gorsuch
Comes as Democratic senator in state Trump won opposes Supreme Court pick

Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wisc., is facing criticism from Republicans for opposing Judge Neil Gorsuch's nomination to the Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans are targeting Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., for her opposition to President Donald Trump's Supreme Court pick Judge Neil Gorsuch.

Baldwin, who is up for re-election in 2018, has said she would oppose Gorsuch’s nomination, but said she would meet with him, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.

Elizabeth Warren Emerges as GOP Boogeyman
Republicans are eager to tie vulnerable Democrats to Massachusetts liberal

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has been invoked in early GOP attacks so far against vulnerable Democratic senators even though she isn’t likely to face a competitive re-election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A Massachusetts poll making the rounds this week implied that Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren may be in trouble in 2018. But without a declared challenger, it’s hard to see much danger on the horizon for Warren in a blue state. 

The bigger question is not whether Warren is well-liked in her own state, but whether she’s disliked enough in other states to be a liability for Democrats facing re-election in places President Donald Trump won last year.

TPP and Keystone Actions Unite Trump With Some Vulnerable Democrats
Trump’s move put him in line with red-state senators up in 2018

Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin supports Trump’s action on the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In just the first days of his administration, President Donald Trump signed executive actions on issues pushed by some of the same Senate Democrats his party wants to defeat in 2018.

By withdrawing the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which almost all Democrats now oppose, Trump on Monday put himself more in line with vulnerable red-state Democrats than some members of his own party.

Trump Executive Actions Put Leaders on the Spot
In twist, Democrats cheer TPP-killing move as Republicans squirm

Donald Trump greets President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. Three days later, Trump set up conflicts with his own party’s leaders by killing Obama’s Asian trade pact. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump began unraveling major parts of his predecessor’s legacy on Monday, but some of his first proclamations and actions as president immediately put him at odds with his own party’s congressional leaders.

The new president mingled Monday evening with Republican and Democratic leaders in the White House’s ornate State Dining Room, the kind of social event Barack Obama rarely hosted at the executive mansion.

Senate Democrats Want More Time to Question Trump’s Education Nominee
Committee members limited to five minutes of questioning

Senate HELP Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., plans to hold one round of questions during Education Secretary nominee Betsy DeVos’ scheduled hearing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats are seeking to extend the five minutes they will be allowed to question President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for Education secretary Betsy DeVos during her confirmation hearing next week, arguing her nomination raises a slew of issues that need more time to be examined.

While the confirmation hearings for some of Trump’s Cabinet picks have stretched for many hours, Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., said he would stick to the committee’s standard of holding one round of questions during DeVos’ scheduled hearing at 5 p.m. on Jan. 17. After opening statements by Alexander and ranking member Patty Murray of Washington, the 12 Republicans and 11 Democrats on the committee will be limited to five minutes of questioning, he said.

Democratic Senate Incumbents Could Withstand Rust Belt Shift
An early look at the re-election prospects of 4 senators from Trump states

Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown will be up for re-election in 2018 in Ohio, where Republicans Donald Trump and Sen. Rob Portman won handily last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In the final stretch of the 2016 campaign, Paul Maslin could sense that former Sen. Russ Feingold was in trouble, as the Wisconsin Democrat tried to win back his Senate seat from Republican incumbent Sen. Ron Johnson.

“I could feel Johnson found a message groove and Russ was doing sort of a victory lap,” said Maslin, a Democratic consultant in the Badger State, who was doing work for the independent expenditure arm of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

Press Secretaries Group Seeking to Welcome Senate Newcomers
Bipartisan organization gearing up for February trip to New York

The Senate Press Secretaries Association has existed for more than 40 years. (Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)

Senators need to work across the aisle if they want to get much done.

The same can be said for their staff members, even the communications shops that alternate between partisan blasts and collaborating on news conferences, hearings and releases about bipartisan legislation.