Tammy Baldwin

Senate Democrats Wage Eleventh-Hour Twitter War on GOP Health Care Bill
Vote Tuesday decides whether chamber moves ahead with Obamacare repeal

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., was one of a slew of Democrats to take part in a late Twitter flurry against the GOP health care overhaul ahead of a momentous vote to proceed Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats in the last 24 hours have launched a furious volley of attacks against their colleagues across the aisle ahead of the vote Tuesday on whether to proceed with the GOP health care bill that would dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

The Democrats hope Twitter is their Agincourt and tweets their arrows.

Human Rights Campaign Announces $26 Million Midterm Push
Plans to go ‘beyond resistance’ against Trump and Republicans

President of the Human Rights Campaign Chad Griffin said his group plans to focus on “pro-equality candidates and initiatives.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One Reason Why Republicans Don’t Have More Women in the Senate
GOP misses a rare opportunity in Missouri

Missouri Rep. Ann Wagner, left, and Tennessee Rep. Diane Black at a news conference on Capitol Hill in February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Women make up less than 10 percent of the Republican senators in Congress, and the GOP’s most qualified (and only top-tier) female hopeful just walked off the Senate playing field with nary a protest from Republican leaders.

Missouri Rep. Ann Wagner’s challenge to Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill has been one of the worst-kept secrets of the cycle. The third-term congresswoman, a former United States ambassador and onetime co-chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, had $2.8 million in her campaign account at the end of March. She had been doing everything a future Senate candidate was supposed to do, right up until Monday when she announced she was running for re-election to her 2nd District seat instead.

Health Care Politics Serve as Senate Bill Text Prelude
Wednesday’s campaign fodder a preview of Thursday’s discussion draft

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is preparing to release a draft bill to rework the U.S. health insurance system he has assembled in secret. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate procedural wonks huddled Wednesday with the parliamentarian’s office, making their case for whether Republican legislation to rework the health insurance system complies with the chamber’s rules, even as Washington braced for the release of the draft GOP measure. 

Over the next week, though, the debate will play out on both the procedural and political fields.

Senate Democrats Find Message on Trump’s Tax, Health Care Promises
Criticism expected to be major 2018 theme for minority party

President Donald Trump, center, acknowledges House Republicans after they passed legislation aimed at repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law, during an event in the Rose Garden at the White House on Thursday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump rode into the White House on a populist wave with promises to protect working, middle-class families and vows to put the concerns of Main Street over those of Wall Street. 

But for Senate Democrats, those campaign pledges have yet to materialize in the Republicans’ first two major legislative priorities under a unified GOP government: repealing the 2010 health care law and overhauling the tax code.

Republicans Concerned About Crowded Primary Against Baldwin
No fewer than eight GOP candidates making moves or being recruited to run

Incumbent Wisconsin Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin has already raised more than $2 million in 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Wisconsin Republicans worry that a crowded Senate primary could make it harder for them to beat Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin.

Republicans feel that Baldwin is vulnerable — President Donald Trump became the first Republican to win Wisconsin since Ronald Reagan in 1984. And Republican Sen. Ron Johnson also won re-election against former Sen. Russ Feingold last year in a rematch of their 2010 Senate race.

In Wisconsin, Trump Returns to ‘America First’ Message
Schumer slams Trump for ‘empty’ actions on jobs, trade

President Donald Trump signs an executive order to try to bring jobs back to American workers and revamp the H-1B visa guest worker program during a visit to the headquarters of tool manufacturer Snap-On on April 18, 2017 in Kenosha, Wisconsin. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump returned to his nationalist “America first” message on Tuesday after spending most of the previous 12 days focused on Syria and North Korea.

Trump, until he began speaking at a Snap-On Tools factory in Wisconsin, had appeared in recent days to be drifting a bit from the populist message that helped him win manufacturing states like the one he visited Tuesday, as well as Michigan, Ohio and others. But after touring the plant, he was back at it, hailing “American workers” and threatening countries that “steal” their jobs.

Liberal PAC Makes First Senate Endorsements of 2018
Brown, Baldwin and Tester score early backing from End Citizens United

Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown and Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin have earned the endorsement of End Citizens United. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Three Democratic senators from states carried by President Donald Trump last fall have earned the backing of an influential liberal political action committee.

End Citizens United announced its support Thursday for the re-election campaigns of Sens. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Jon Tester of Montana, in its first endorsements of the 2018 cycle. 

Senate LGBT Staff Group Provides Bipartisan Professional Development
GLASS caucus prioritizes being a safe space for its members

The Senate GLASS Caucus board. Back row left to right: Robert Curis, Mario Semiglia, Trelaine Ito, Russell Page. Front row left to right: Peter Narby, Tré Easton, Caitlin Hart, Andrew Shine, Michelle Mittler. (Photo courtesy of the Senate GLASS Caucus)

The Senate GLASS Caucus was created to provide a safe space for staffers on Capitol Hill who might still feel uncomfortable about being openly gay in their offices.

The caucus’ co-chairmen this year are Caitlin Hart, legislative correspondent for Florida Democrat Bill Nelson, and Andrew Shine, legislative correspondent for Delaware Democrat Thomas R. Carper.

Potential Wisconsin Senate Candidates Attacked Before They Enter Race
Groups post documents that show Republicans with anti-Republican views

Kevin Nicholson was both the beneficiary and target of documents posted to discredit possible candidates in Wisconsin’s 2018 Senate race. (Kevin Nicholson via Facebook)

Two potential Republican Senate candidates in Wisconsin have been targeted by anonymous groups even before they have gotten into the race.

Nichole Schneider, who is considering a run against Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin, was targeted in an anonymous post that alleged she deleted tweets that criticized Republican candidates, including President Donald Trump and whether Catholics could support the then-Republican nominee.