Tammy Duckworth

Trump Will Need Democratic Cooperation to Replace US Attorneys
Judiciary Committee process, plus scarce floor time, could leave career lawyers in charge

Preet Bharara is one of 46 former U.S. attorneys whose posts the Trump administration now has to fill. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

Under normal circumstances, senators might act quickly to advance and confirm a president’s nominees to be U.S. attorneys across the country.

But with President Donald Trump in office, nothing is proving to be ordinary.

Word on the Hill: Is It Spring Yet?
Dates for baseball, softball games announced

It’s time to get into the cherry blossom spirit. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Daylight Saving Time begins Sunday, when we spring our clocks forward an hour at 2 a.m.

Although a couple of days last week felt like spring, it’s forecast to cool down this weekend and only be in the mid-30s on Saturday in Washington.

Franken Returns Donations from Controversial Law Firm
Thorton Law Firm is being investigated for possible campaign finance violations

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., received about $41,000 in contributions from Boston law firm being investigated. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., returned $40,822 donated to him from a Boston law firm currently being investigated for potentially illegal campaign contributions.

An investigation into the Boston-based Thorton Law Firm by The Boston Globe and the Center for Responsive Politics revealed that Thorton essentially reimbursed employees for political contributions through bonus checks that totaled the exact amount of the donation.

Senate Democrats Plan All-Nighter Over EPA Nominee
But Scott Pruitt is likely to be confirmed despite objections

Scott Pruitt is the current attorney general of Oklahoma. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats are planning to once again stage a series of overnight speeches on the Senate floor, this time in opposition to Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s nomination to head the EPA. 

“We intend to stand our ground,” said Delaware Sen. Thomas R. Carper, the ranking Democrat on the Environment and Public Works Committee. While Pruitt appears poised for confirmation, Carper said Democrats were not going quietly into the night.

Wisconsin’s Sean Duffy Will Forgo Senate Bid
Other potential candidates had been waiting on congressman’s decision

Rep. Sean Duffy announced he’s passing on a challenge to Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Update 9:35 a.m. Feb. 16 with Duffy announcement

Wisconsin Rep. Sean P. Duffy announced Thursday he will pass on a run for Senate in 2018.

Word on the Hill: Love Is in the Air
Puppies and friends of national service

On Valentine’s Day 2005, California Sen. Barbara Boxer received about 4,000 roses in her Hart building office from supporters. Boxer donated the flowers to injured military members at Walter Reed Naval Hospital in Bethesda Maryland. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Snap a photograph and tweet @HeardontheHill or email HOH@rollcall.com if you see anyone around Capitol Hill receiving a Valentine’s Day gift.

Cory Booker’s Bear Hug
New Jersey Democrat shows Team McMahon love, until voting time

Linda McMahon did not get New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker’s vote, but he did express an interest in working out with her son-in-law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Cory Booker could have asked Linda McMahon, President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Small Business Administration, pretty much anything.

At McMahon’s confirmation hearing on Jan. 24, he could have asked the former CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment about how WWE fudges attendance numbers at Wrestlemanias. That could have been interesting in light of Trump’s insistence that more people attended his inauguration than actually did, a provable falsehood.

Hail to the Chiefs
Incoming members look to different corners for chiefs of staff

Minh Ta, former chief of staff to Wisconsin Rep. Gwen Moore, is moving over to freshman Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester‘s office to serve as her chief. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With President-elect Donald Trump rounding out his Cabinet, new members of Congress have been going through a similar — although more predictable — process of filling out their congressional offices. 

The first and most important hires are almost always the chiefs of staff, who come from all walks of political life. Most commonly, new members tap their campaign managers or the chiefs of departing members. They also often retain members of their kitchen cabinets, or close personal advisers, as their chiefs. 

Bipartisan Mood as Congress Sworn in
Hugs, greetings across the aisle as contentious issues loom

Rep.-elect Lisa Blunt Rochester, D-Del., waves to the gallery as she arrives on the House floor to take the oath of office on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

For many, their first day of work in Washington was dreary and puddle-filled, but in the Senate, there were no political parties for a brief moment.

During a full day of rain in the nation’s capital, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. returned to the Senate perhaps for the last time to swear in the 27 re-elected senators and seven newly elected ones.

Word on the Hill: Swearing In
Events surrounding the first day of the new Congress

Former Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, right, conducted a special swearing-in ceremony with Rep. Darin LaHood, R-Ill., in the Capitol in September. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy 2017 and welcome back!

Congress is in full force today with Senate and House swearing-in of the 115th Congress. Stay tuned for Roll Call’s coverage all day.