Terri A Sewell

Rating Change: Alabama Senate Race No Longer Solid GOP
Polarizing potential nominee could give Democrats a shot at takeover

Alabama Republican Roy Moore finished first in Tuesday’s special election GOP Senate primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Alabama Senate special election certainly isn’t a toss-up, but the possibility that former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore might become the Republican nominee creates the potential for a Democratic upset.

President Donald Trump’s polarizing persona is creating significant risk for congressional Republicans in next year’s midterm elections. But his decision to pluck Alabama Republican Jeff Sessions out of the Senate for his Cabinet created a special election this year that is turning out to be more adventurous than expected, considering Trump won the Yellowhammer State by 28 points less than a year ago.

Moore, Strange Advance to Runoff in Alabama Senate Primary
Pair will face off on Sept. 26 for Republican nomination

Alabama Republican Roy Moore, center, was the top finisher in the special election GOP Senate primary on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judge Roy Moore and Sen. Luther Strange will advance to a Republican primary runoff in the Alabama special election Senate race for the remaining term of former Sen. Jeff Sessions’ seat.

With 98 percent of precincts reporting, Moore led Strange 39 percent to 33 percent, The Associated Press reported. Since neither candidate garnered more than 50 percent of the vote, Moore and Strange, as the top two finishers in the nine-person field, will face off in a Sept. 26 runoff. 

Doug Jones Wins Democratic Primary in Alabama Senate Race
Republican contest heading for runoff between Moore and Strange

Doug Jones won the special election Senate Democratic primary in Alabama on Tuesday night. (Courtesy Doug Jones Facebook page)

Former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones handily won the Democratic primary in the Alabama special election Senate race Tuesday night, while the Republican primary is heading into a runoff.

Jones, who successfully prosecuted two suspects in the 1963 bombing of a Birmingham church, won the primary outright. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, he led a seven-candidate field with 66 percent of the vote, The Associated Press reported. 

Opinion: Will Move to Purge Ohio Voting Rolls Kickstart Congressional Action?
Justice Department no ally on civil rights issue

Civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., recounts his experience in Selma, Alabama, to a group of students gathered on the House steps on April 15, 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Fifty-two years ago this week, John Lewis of Georgia was a young activist, not the Democratic congressman he is today. Yet he got a warmer welcome from the then-president of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, than from today’s occupant of the White House.

On the Twitter feed of the longtime member of the U.S. House of Representatives, you can see a picture celebrating that time a few decades ago, when, with Democratic and Republican support, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed and then signed.

Trump Stances Could Affect Cross-Border Energy Trade

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, arrives to chair the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on near-term outlook for energy and commodity markets on Tuesday, jan. 19, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When President Donald Trump signed an executive order in April to impose a tariff on Canadian softwood lumber, the administration and its supporters heralded the move as an equalizing measure meant to bolster domestic timber production.

For Trump, the tariff was the latest move meant to build on his “America First” campaign platform. The action his administration took amounted to a tariff in the form of an import tax totaling around 20 percent for softwood lumber imports from Canada. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross estimated the measure could result in $1 billion a year from Canadian lumber imports, which make up about one-third of the U.S. lumber market.

Voting Rights Battle Just Getting Underway
Two Democratic bills introduced before Trump commission’s sweeping request to states

New Orleans voter Albertine Reid leaves the booth at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology in the city’s Lower Ninth Ward on Election Day last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even before the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity raised alarms with its sweeping requests for state voter data, House Democrats rolled out legislation they hope will ensure the voting process is fair.

One measure, introduced at a news conference on Capitol Hill on June 22, would restore voter protections across 13 mostly Southern states. Sponsored by Alabama’s Terri A. Sewell and Georgia’s John Lewis, a civil rights icon, the measure is a response to the Supreme Court’s 2013 Shelby v. Holder decision. That ruling struck down provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that required those states to seek federal approval before changing voter laws and also set a formula for determining which states would be subject to the law. 

Congressional Republicans Criticize Trump’s Comments About TV Anchor
President tweeted he turned down meeting as Mika Brzezinski was ‘bleeding badly from a face-lift’

Kansas Rep. Lynn Jenkins said President Donald Trump’s remarks about MSNBC host Mike Brzezinski were “not okay.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 5:59 p.m. | Republican members of Congress criticized President Donald Trump for his comments about TV host Mika Brzezinski on Thursday.

Trump tweeted early in the day that he turned down a meeting with Brzezinski and her “Morning Joe” co-host Joe Scarborough because she was “bleeding badly from a face-lift.”

Word on the Hill: House Men’s Workout
Vegan cooking and snacking

Oklahoma Rep. Markwayne Mullin, seen here with his daughter Larra at the Capitol on Wednesday, is a host of the annual men's workout. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As if you haven’t had enough bipartisan congressional athletic events, the annual Men’s Health Caucus workout is this morning, hosted by Reps. Markwayne Mullin, R-Okla., and Donald M. Payne Jr., D-N.J.

It’s at 7 a.m. in the park across from the Longworth House Office Building. Samantha Clayton, director of Global Fitness at Herbalife Nutrition, and Clifton Crosby, former NFL player, will also be there.

Sewell Staffer Says Ways and Means Void Has Been Filled
Sashrina Thomas also worked for Stephanie Tubbs Jones, last African-American woman on panel

Shashrina Thomas has worked for Rep. Terri A. Sewell since 2014. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Shashrina Thomas is the bridge between the first and second African-American women to serve on the House Ways and Means Committee.

It had been nine years since an African-American woman served on the panel until Alabama Democrat Terri A. Sewell joined this year with the help of Thomas, her chief of staff.

Town Hall Outrage Turns From Health Care to Comey Firing
Lawmakers hear from constituents about Trump’s dismissal of FBI director

Rep. Jared Huffman, D-Calif., told a town hall crowd that dynamics in Congress might change that could possibly lead to impeachment. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Town hall audiences on Tuesday shifted their outrage from the Republican health care bill to the firing of FBI Director James Comey.

Many of the questions were centered around health care and the vote last week by Republicans to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law and a number of Republicans had to defend the plan.