Tim Scott

Puzder Is First Trump Nominee Spiked by GOP
Votes just weren’t there for fast-food tycoon

Andrew Puzder, left was the first of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees to not get enough Republican votes for confirmation. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The withdrawal of Andrew Puzder’s nomination to be Labor secretary represents a milestone in the nascent Trump administration: the first time congressional Republicans played a significant part in spiking a Donald Trump Cabinet pick. 

The nomination of the CEO of CKE Restaurants, which runs the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s chains, had been plagued by scandal, including revelations he had employed an undocumented immigrant as a housekeeper and failed to pay taxes on her, as well as the fallout from a 1987 divorce that brought up allegations of domestic violence against him.

Black History Month: Tim Scott on What His Election Meant, and What Obama's Election Meant to His Grandfather
Roll Call's series with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures continues

South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott says he stands on the “shoulders of giants who paid such a high price so that I could represent … the entire state.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Tim Scott sees a lot of progress in his election and the election of the first African-American president more than eight years ago. Both show “what’s possible,” he said. 

Roll Call’s series of interviews with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures during Black History Month continues with our discussion with the South Carolina Republican.

The Rules That Stopped Elizabeth Warren Are Waiting for Donald Trump, Too
Senate norms have never been more important in our democracy

Under Senate rules, President Donald Trump’s proposals will have to get through the chamber based on the merits of his policies, not the volume of his arguments, Murphy writes. Senators are seen here at the president’s inauguration last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rule 19 had its close-up this week, didn’t it? To be specific, Section 3 of Rule 19, did, when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell informed Sen. Elizabeth Warren that she had “impugned the motives and conduct” of her fellow senator, Jeff Sessions, when she read a letter that Coretta Scott King had written about him many years ago.

When Warren was told, “The senator shall take her seat,” she took the Coretta Scott King letter, marched a few feet off the Senate floor, and took a different seat in front of a Facebook Live feed that went out to millions. The standoff launched a battle cry for any woman who has ever felt marginalized, belittled or silenced — which, by the way, is nearly all of us. A thousand hashtags bloomed. #SheWasWarned #ShePersisted #LetLizSpeak. You get the picture.

Mike Pence Is the Oath-Administrant in Chief
Trump delegates swearing-in of Cabinet members mostly to VP

Vice President Mike Pence, far right, delivers a ceremonious oath of office to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson last week in the Oval Office as Tillerson’s wife Renda St. Clair and President Donald Trump look on. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump stood just to his vice president’s right as Mike Pence delivered a ceremonial oath of office to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. The same scene played out eight days later as Pence officially swore in Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Thursday.

One of Pence’s most regular duties, three weeks into the Trump administration’s tenure, is introducing his boss before public remarks. Almost as often, though, Pence is the oath-administrant in chief.

GOP Seeks a Safe Space From the Words of Coretta Scott King
Echoes of Trump in Senate Republicans’ silencing of Elizabeth Warren

Coretta Scott King speaking at the reception for the unveiling of Rosa Parks' bust sculpture at the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C., in 1991. (Courtesy the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

For a party and an administration that ran on being tough guys, afraid of nothing and no one, and disdainful of “PC culture,” whatever that’s supposed to mean, Republicans are, like President Donald Trump, proving to be poster boys (and, yes, the crew is testosterone-heavy) for the perpetually offended, perfect pictures of bullies who crumble when one of their targets dares talk back.

Twitter outrage over the latest “Saturday Night Live” parodies — of Trump and, this past week, Press Secretary Sean Spicer — are becoming weekly routines, expected and easy to dismiss. It’s just jokes, folks, no need to get so worked up. And piling partisan political significance onto the Super Bowl — the teams, commercials and half-time entertainment — is more than one football game can bear.

Celebrating Black History Month With Added Resonance
Obama retirement, record number of black lawmakers mark 2017

Former President Barack Obama's departure from the East Front of the Capitol on Jan. 20 was a bittersweet moment for African-American members of Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Black History Month this year has taken on an added resonance, reflected in the record number of African-Americans in Congress.

In the Senate, it has been a long buildup to the current high-water mark of three members: Republican Tim Scott of South Carolina and Democrats Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California. 

Bipartisan Group Eyes Tax Overhaul for Anti-Poverty Push
Lawmakers renew push for the "Investing in Opportunity Act"

Sen. Tim Scott is part of the bipartisan group pushing for the “Investment in Opportunity Act.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A bipartisan group of lawmakers is hoping its anti-poverty legislation will become law this year as part of a broader push for a tax overhaul.

“We are teed up for success in this Congress,” Sen. Tim Scott said. “The realistic opportunity for tax reform was not last Congress. It’s this Congress.”

Sports Site Wants Proof That Cruz Has Got Game
Asks for photos of him taking it to the 'basketball ring'

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, is working to improve his relationships with senators with a pickup basketball game among his colleagues, Politico reported. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call).

A Politico Magazine profile reported Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, has started a pickup basketball game in the Senate to try to repair frayed relationships with his colleagues, but a sports site is calling BS.

The profile notes that Cruz has organized a weekly game in the Russell Senate Office Building and Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., has played and 2016 presidential rival Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., will likely take part soon.