Todd Rokita

House GOP Has Message for Senate on Shutdown: Nuke the Filibuster
McCarthy reiterates call for changes

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy renewed his call for the Senate to change its rules. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans say Senate Democrats are holding government funding “hostage” to their demands on immigration. And they’ve got an idea for ending the crisis: Throw away the filibuster.

The legislative tool of the minority is one of the few remaining things that distinguish the Senate from the House. House Republicans are putting pressure on their Senate GOP colleagues to pursue the so-called nuclear option — change chamber rules and end the legislative filibuster, at least on spending bills.

Analysis: It’s a Blue House Wave, but Not Yet a Senate One
Rural, Trump-friendly states make for a formidable map for Democrats

Sens. Jon Tester of Montana and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota are among the Democrats’ many vulnerable incumbents this cycle, which complicates the party’s efforts to retake the Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo.)

“The odds are greater than half we will take back the Senate.” — Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” on Monday night 

Democrats ought to temper their optimism about the fight for the Senate this year.

Report: Rokita Received More than $160,000 from Casino Group as He Pushed Bill
Contributors would stand to benefit from the bill

Rep. Todd Rokita, R-Ind., has received more than $160,000 from tribal gambling groups and Native American tribes after sponsoring legislation that would benefit them. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Senate candidate and Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita is facing criticism for having received money from a casino interest group that would benefit from legislation he is pushing.

The Associated Press reported that Rokita, who is running to challenge Democratic incumbent Sen. Joe Donnelly, received more than $160,000 from Native American gambling interest groups.

Some GOP Senate Candidates Follow Party’s Evolution on Moore
Like McConnell, candidates moved away from calling on Ala. Republican to step aside

Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita said he’d be “comfortable” with Alabama GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore in the Senate. He previously suggested Moore should drop out. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

While many sitting Republican senators — including Alabama’s own Richard C. Shelby — have continued to criticize Roy Moore, a few candidates who’d like to join them in the Senate have taken a more measured tone leading up to Tuesday’s election.

In several cases, that warmer embrace (or less forceful rejection) of the Alabama GOP Senate nominee is a change in tone from their previous public statements.

Why Did an Indiana Super PAC Endorse Alabama’s Roy Moore?
Locally, Indiana First PAC endorsed Jim Banks, plans to play in open 4th and 6th Districts

Indiana First PAC has endorsed Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore, above, but has no plans to play in Indiana’s Senate primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Indiana First PAC earned attention this week for endorsing Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore.

But what is an Indiana-based super PAC — which has yet to file with the Federal Election Commission — doing in another state’s Senate race when it doesn’t even plan to play in its own?

Businessman Makes Indiana Senate Primary Three-Person Race
Mike Braun making first statewide TV ad buys in the race

Screenshot of Mike Braun for U.S. Senate ad.

In what’s been largely characterized as a contest between two Republican members of Congress, a businessman with the ability to self-fund has made the first statewide TV and radio buys in the Indiana Senate primary.

Former state Rep. Mike Braun’s $329,000 three-week radio and TV buy signals he’s making this a three-person race. He announced his campaign in August. 

As Messer and Rokita Squabble, Third GOP Indiana Senate Hopeful Sees Opening
Self-funded state representative looks to sneak around infighting en route to nomination

Indiana state Rep. Mike Braun, who owns an automotive supply business, said if you’re not willing to spend big, it doesn’t “matter how well people might like you.”  (Mike Braun for Indiana)

With Reps. Luke Messer and Todd Rokita trading insults in the Indiana Senate Republican primary, a third candidate seeks to quietly bypass the kerfuffle en route to the GOP nod.

State Rep. Mike Braun has flooded his war chest with nearly $800,000 of his own money and raised $200,000 more, mostly from business associates of his automotive supply business. The GOP primary winner will face vulnerable Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly

Trump Loyalty Contest Takes Hold in Indiana Senate Primary
Rokita team thinks Alabama results bode well for his “defeat the elite” campaign

Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita is running for Senate with the slogan “defeat the elite.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 6 p.m. It’s not just primary challengers to sitting GOP senators who are feeling emboldened by the defeat of Alabama Sen. Luther Strange this week.

Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita took heart that the anti-establishment energy that propelled President Donald Trump to victory last fall is still in force,  with his campaign predicting that same movement will help him defeat fellow Hoosier Rep. Luke Messer in next year’s Senate primary.

Susan Brooks Chooses Sides in Indiana Senate Primary
GOP congresswoman endorses Luke Messer, will chair “Women for Luke”

Indiana Rep. Susan W. Brooks is the first member of the Hoosier delegation to publicly choose sides in the Senate GOP primary battle between Reps. Luke Messer and Todd Rokita. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Indiana Rep. Susan W. Brooks endorsed fellow Hoosier Rep. Luke Messer’s Senate bid Wednesday. She’s the first member of the delegation to publicly choose sides in what’s already become a nasty member-on-member primary war between Messer and Rep. Todd Rokita as the GOP tries to unseat the Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly.

“Luke and I have been friends for a long time, and being his colleague and watching him work up close, I have no doubt he'll make a great U.S. Senator,” Brooks said in a statement.

For Joe Donnelly, a Long History of Bucking His Party
Indiana Democrat faces challenging re-election, which is also nothing new

Sen. Joe Donnelly often goes his own way on hot-button policy positions, and has since his time in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — The fate of Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly’s re-election bid next year may lie in his ability to convince Hoosiers he’s not always on the same page as the national Democratic Party. Fortunately for him, he has a lot of practice, and has been highly successful at it, going back more than a dozen years.

“The party occasionally gets mad, I really don’t care,” said one of the Democrats’ most endangered incumbents.