Tulsi Gabbard

Ed Case’s Comeback Bid Continues in Hawaii Race for Hanabusa’s Seat
Former congressman wins crowded Democratic primary in 1st District

Hawaii Rep. Colleen Hanabusa lost her bid for governor Saturday night. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 7:52 a.m. | Former Rep. Ed Case won the Democratic nomination in Hawaii’s open 1st District on Saturday night, and is likely returning to Congress next year to represent the deep-blue seat. Case previously served two terms in the House from the 2nd District.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting, Case led a seven-way primary field with 40 percent of the vote, The Associated Press reported. Lt. Gov. Doug Chin and state Sen. Donna Mercado Kim trailed behind with 26 percent and 18 percent respectively.

Ryan Discovers He’s Part Jewish, and More Congressional Root-Finders
The speaker will appear on the fifth season of ‘Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.’

PBS show traced Ryan back to his 10th great-grandfather. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Catholic Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan is a little bit Jewish.

Ryan taped an episode of the PBS series “Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.” and found that he’s 3 percent Ashkenazi Jewish, the Associated Press reported. He traced his heritage back to his 10th great-grandfather, who was born in Germany in 1531.

Congress to Terror Groups: Hands Off Our Weapons
Defense policy bill provision aims to prohibit Pentagon from arming terror groups

Language championed by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard among others has landed in the defense authorization bill that would prohibit terror groups from getting weapons from Pentagon. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

If terror groups in the Middle East want more weapons to aid their fight against the U.S. military and its allies in the region, they won’t get them from the Pentagon.

It may seem obvious that the Defense Department wouldn’t arm its enemies, but that didn’t stop lawmakers from including a provision in the final fiscal 2019 defense authorization bill that forbids the U.S. military from assisting three terror organizations with a presence in Syria.

Floor Charts for the Floor Show
Our favorite visual aids from congressional floor-watching

(Courtesy @FloorCharts screenshot of C-SPAN)

From tributes to senators to hours of testimony from a tech giant, spring has been a visual mixed bag in Congress.

Lawmakers like these oversized and sometimes garish visual aids because they help them get their point across. The Twitter handle @FloorCharts posts some of the daily highlights, and we’re doing a monthly roundup of the best of the best.

Here’s What Members Are Doing With Their Salary During Shutdown
Withholding, returning and donating, lawmakers say they’re refusing salary while government is shut down

Signs are posted outside of the Library of Congress in Washington on Sunday notifying visitors that all Library of Congress buildings will be closed to the public during the government shutdown. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A government shutdown always unleashes a cascade of political histrionics, and chief among those is lawmakers “refusing” their salaries.

Scores of senators and House members sent out news releases over the weekend defiantly proclaiming what they would do with their salaries while the government remains shuttered.

Bipartisan Group Wants to End Taxpayer Money for Harassment Settlements
Members led by Rep. Ron Desantis also aim to disclose settlements dating back to 1995

Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., is interviewed by a TV news crew outside of the House chamber. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan group of members announced legislation that would end the practice of using taxpayer money to settle claims of sexual harassment on Capitol Hill.

Republican Reps. Ron DeSantis of Florida and Tennessee’s Marsha Blackburn were joined by Democratic Reps. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, Jim Cooper also of Tennessee and Kathleen Rice of New York. 

Word on the Hill: Darkest Hour
Free lunch, Bison day, Hirono’s health update, new D.C. book and Christopher Nolan at LOC

(Screen shot of “Darkest Hour” trailer)

The new movie “Darkest Hour” will be screened in D.C. this evening, followed by a panel that includes House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Rep. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y.

NBC’s Chuck Todd will moderate the panel at the United States Navy Memorial (701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW) at 7:15 p.m. The movie’s star, actor Gary Oldman, is also scheduled to attend.

Opinion: Stuck on the Back Bench? Why Not Run for President
Last House member to win presidency was in 1880 — it was an accident

An engraving of President James A. Garfield’s assassination. Not since Garfield has a sitting House member so much as won an electoral vote in a presidential election. (Engraving from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper)

No sitting House member has won an electoral vote for president since 1880, when Ohio’s James A. Garfield captured the White House — and he didn’t even mean to run for the job.

In fact, the Ohio legislature had just voted to appoint Garfield to a Senate term — for which he would have been seated in March 1881 — when the GOP met in Chicago to pick its nominee for the presidency in the summer of 1880.

Word on the Hill: Trump Is a Conversation Starter
Staffer events happening today

President Donald Trump’s first travel ban executive order is now the subject of a social media study. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When President Donald Trump first announced his temporary travel ban on immigrants from several Muslim-majority countries, one group started looking into how Americans were reacting to the news on social media.

Stratos Jets, a private jet charter service, has looked at more than 120,000 tweets related to the ban. It found that two days after the first executive order, more than 35 percent of those tweets contained the hashtag #NoBan.

Radel Dishes on His Career — and a Little About Cocaine
Former Florida congressman’s book released Tuesday

Trey Radel, then a Florida congressman, leaves court in November 2013 after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge of cocaine possession. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Florida Republican Rep. Trey Radel, who resigned after he was convicted of cocaine possession, comes clean about his short-lived career in Congress and shares a little about the drug that doomed him.

“While my deepest personal weaknesses cut short my dreams and work in Congress, I picked myself up. As individuals and a country, we can do the same,” he sums up in “Democrazy: A True Story of Weird Politics, Money, Madness & Finger Food.” The 300-page account of his life and times was released Tuesday.