Virginia Foxx

With Signature, Trump Tries to Chip Away at Obamacare
President’s bold promises not reflected in heavily bureaucratic order

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Thursday that could mean major changes for former President Barack Obama’s signature 2010 health care law. Also pictured, Vice President Mike Pence; Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, sixth from left; North Carolina Rep. Virginia Foxx, third from left; Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, left. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump continued chipping away at his predecessor’s legacy when he signed an executive order Thursday that spells major changes for President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law. But the order merely directs agencies to craft new rules that one senior official would only say could “possibly” help millions of Americans despite Trump’s bold promises.

Trump called the order a “historic announcement” and promised it would come at zero cost to federal coffers. During a signing ceremony at the White House, he also promised it would bring more affordable coverage to “millions,” and said plans would be available “all across state lines” with competition among providers that he promised will be “staggering.”

McConnell Seeks Exception to Rules for School
Kentucky Republican wants to keep federal funding for home-state college

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s amendment would provide flexibility on default rates to schools in economically depressed regions. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is asking the Education Department to skirt its rules and make an exception to provide federal dollars to a college in his home state — even though a high percentage of its graduates defaulted on their students loans for the last three years.

McConnell’s move is part of a larger debate about the criteria to determine whether a college should receive federal funding or be cut off. Currently, the Education Department uses data on what is known as the cohort default rate — or how many of a college’s graduates default on their loans — to decide whether the school is a good investment for taxpayer money.

Student Loan Program About to Expire
Legislation to extend it blocked

Sen. Lamar Alexander blocked legislation to extend a college student loan program with bipartisan support. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A college student loan program with bipartisan support will expire Saturday after key Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander blocked legislation to extend it.

The need-based program will lapse midnight Saturday, depriving tens of thousands of college students of a source of financial aid that is a mix of federal dollars and college contributions.

Press Team Victorious at Spelling Bee Against Lawmakers
 

Politicians Lose Press Club Spelling Bee to Media Again
Rep. Ted Deutch, the last politician standing, lost to Dallas Morning News’ Todd Gillman

Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., smiles before being asked to spell "rubicund" at the National Press Club Spelling Bee on Tuesday. On the right is Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., and eventual winner Todd Gillman of the Dallas Morning News is at left. (Bian Elkhatib/CQ Roll Call)

The media team won the National Press Club Spelling Bee for the second year in a row when Todd Gillman of the Dallas Morning News correctly spelled “somatotype.”

The annual spelling bee pits the media against members of Congress to raise money for the National Press Club Journalism Institute.

Word on the Hill: Busy Week
Your social calendar for the week

Events all over D.C. to explore this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Monday and welcome back.

This week is packed with things to do around the D.C. area.

Beyer on the Words That Made His Spelling Bee Career
Virginia Democrat tries to win back his National Press Club Spelling Bee title

Members of the politicians’ team after the National Press Club Spelling Bee in 2015. From left, Rep. Brad Ashford of Nebraska, Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr. of New Jersey, the winner Rep. Donald S. Beyer Jr. of Virginia, Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, and Rep. Tom Emmer of Minnesota. (Courtesy Noel St. John/National Press Club)

In one of Washington’s most beloved nerdfests, members of Congress will take on members of the D.C. media in the National Press Club Spelling Bee on Tuesday.

Rep. Donald S. Beyer Jr., who won for the politicians’ team in 2015, has redemption on his mind.

Word on the Hill: Drawing a Line on Good Taste
Opioid discussion, one week until the Press Club’s spelling bee

From left, Steve Hendrickson as Frank Butley, Jacqueline Correa as Tania Del Valle, Dan Domingues as Pablo Del Valle, and Sally Wingert as Virginia Butley in “Native Gardens,” running through Oct. 22 at Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater. (Courtesy Dan Norman/Guthrie Theater)

Native Gardens” opened at the Mead Center for American Theater on Friday. The play runs until Oct. 22 at the center’s Arena Stage.

The comedy features actors Jacqueline Correa and Dan Domingues as Tania and Pablo Del Valle, a couple who move to Washington, D.C., next door to Frank and Virginia Butley, played by Steve Hendrickson and Sally Wingert. Pablo is a young lawyer and Tania is a pregnant Ph.D. candidate while the Butleys are a deeply rooted D.C. couple.

‘Very Competitive’ House GOP Conference Takes the Digital Challenge
Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers started competition to push colleagues into the 21st century

From left, California Rep. Mimi Walters, More magazine Editor-in-Chief Lesley Jane Seymour, House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Tennessee Rep. Diane Black, North Carolina Rep. Virginia Foxx take a selfie in McMorris Rodgers’ conference office. (Courtesy McMorris Rodgers’ office)

It’s not often House Republicans get a chance to compete against one another, but Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers is giving them the opportunity. 

“Clearly, this is a conference full of a lot of Type A, very competitive individuals and so they embrace the challenge and it creates a lot of energy,” the House GOP conference chairwoman said.

Word on the Hill: Your D.C. Fourth of July Schedule
Concert, Metro and parking logistics

Prepare for the fireworks on the mall this year. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

So you can plan ahead for this weekend, here is what’s going on in D.C. on the Fourth of July along with some logistical information.

Read HOH’s full Independence Day package, which includes a list of different things to do in the D.C. area, what members do for the holiday and what senators usually do.