Library of Congress

Ellison Talks About How to Hold Officials Accountable on Health Care
Talked about recruiting new leaders

Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., led a town hall with activists on how to push back against Republican efforts to repeal the 2010 health care law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison told Democratic activists on Tuesday that they can prevent a rollback of the 2010 health care law and push for single-payer health care.

Ellison, vice chairman of the Democratic National Committee, took part in a town hall hosted by People’s Action as part of the advocacy group’s founding convention at the Lutheran Church of the Reformation on Capitol Hill.

Royce Gets Democratic Challenger
DCCC is targeting the district, which went for Clinton in 2016

Former California State Fullerton chemistry professor Phil Janowicz is trying to tie incumbent Rep. Ed Royce to President Donald Trump. (Phil Janowicz for Congress)

A former chemistry professor will announce Tuesday he will run against California Republican Rep. Ed Royce in 2018.

Katko Says He’s Not Running for AG in New York
Has raised $467,000 for 2018 campaign

A statement from Rep. John Katko‘s office said he was “honored to be considered” for the attorney general’s race in New York, but he was focused on his district. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. John Katko said he will not be a Republican candidate for  attorney general in New York in 2018.

Katko, who worked as a prosecutor, rebuffed reports from a New York Daily News Article that he was considering a run, CNYCentral.com reported.

Clerks for New Supreme Court Justice Know Capitol Hill
Gorsuch picks also have White House and justice department experience

Clerks for Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch have experience in the White House, the justice department and on Capitol Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The clerks Justice Neil Gorsuch hired to help launch his Supreme Court career bring a wealth of experience from the political branches of government, including work on Capitol Hill, at the Justice Department and the White House.

That, in turn, could help guide Gorsuch on legal issues this term dealing with cases about the inner workings of Congress or politics. While Gorsuch worked for the Justice Department before becoming a federal judge, Justice Stephen G. Breyer is the only justice with experience working for the legislative branch  — as Senate Judiciary Committee counsel in 1979-80 for Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass.

Senate Democrats Look to Make Their Mark on Foreign Policy
With Obama no longer in the White House, minority party is stepping up

Maryland Sen. Benjamin L. Cardinsays there’s no shortage of foreign policy leaders among Senate Democrats. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Democrats are not shying away from criticizing the Trump administration when it comes to foreign policy.

It’s a new and potentially adversarial role: being in the minority while explosive headlines from conflicts abroad dominate the news.

Opinion: Scorecard — America After 100 Days of Trump
The good news is maybe the nation will endure the next four years

The good news is  despite President Donald Trump, the nation may weather the next four years, Walter Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

It may be news to Donald Trump that the original One Hundred Days ended with Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo. In fact, if Trump learned about Napoleon from “Fox & Friends,” he would probably snarl, “I like my conquerors of Europe not to end up exiled to an island so remote you can’t even build a world-class hotel on it.”

The news media may be reeling in an era of fake news, but nothing halts the journalistic passion for predictable rituals like toting up presidential accomplishments after 14 weeks and 2 days in office. Trump himself would admit that he is no Franklin Roosevelt. After all, the 45th president would have spurned marrying a woman like Eleanor Roosevelt — who was never mistaken for an international fashion model when she was touring coal mines on behalf of FDR.

Word on the Hill: Singers on Capitol Hill
Mark your calendars for WHCD parties

Gordon Kennedy and Peter Frampton perform onstage during the 54th annual ASCAP Country Music awards at the Ryman Auditorium on October 31, 2016 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

The ninth annual “We Write the Songs” event is tonight, hosted by the ASCAP Foundation and The Library of Congress. The foundation gave the LOC original manuscripts, lead sheets, lyrics sheets, photographs and letters from some of America’s music creators.

The event will include performances from singers Peter Frampton and Gordon Kennedy (“Baby I Love Your Way” & “Change the World”), Rob Thomas of Matchbox Twenty (“Smooth”), Eric Bazilian & Rob Hyman of the Hooters (“One of Us” & “Time After Time”), and Ledisi (“Pieces of Me”).

Four Arrested for Marijuana Use Near Capitol
DCMJ lead second demonstration in a week that led to arrests

Police made four arrests when marijuana legalization advocates took out joints and edibles and used them on federal land during a DCMJ demonstration Monday.

The group led its #Reschedule420 smoke-in days after seven were arrested while handing out marijuana to congressional staffers on Thursday in honor of 420, also known as National Weed Day.

Podcast: Here's Why Congress Is Facing an Unprecedented Budget Puzzle
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 14

An unprecedented situation is developing in Congress as lawmakers are confronted with not only finishing the fiscal 2017 budget but beginning work on a fiscal 2018 budget, says CQ’s senior budget reporter Paul M. Krawzak. But adding uncertainty to the work are the so-called reconciliation instructions attached to the 2017 budget resolution that spell out how Republicans can repeal Obamacare. At what point do these instructions expire and it's game over for an easy health care repeal? Krawzak explains why this question has become so important, and offers a prediction on when President Trump will present his full budget to Congress.

Why Republicans Don’t Fear a Shutdown, But Should
HealthCare.gov rollout shifted attention back to White House before midterm elections

Republicans didn’t suffer at the ballot box because the rollout of HealthCare.gov was a disaster. They now don’t fear a shutdown — but they should, Nathan L. Gonzales writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

For many Republicans, it’s a fairly simple calculation: There was a supposedly catastrophic government shutdown in 2013 and the GOP gained 13 House seats a year later. So what’s the big deal if the government shuts down again?

With another funding deadline on the horizon, selective memory loss could have negative consequences for the Republican Party if there is another government shutdown.