Washington

HOH’s Guide for Watching the Eclipse in D.C.
You can either avoid or embrace the crowds

Watch here on Monday for photographs of the eclipse and the Washington Monument on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The peak time to view the solar eclipse on Monday in Washington, D.C., is 2:42 p.m. The moon will block part of the sun from our area’s vantage point from about  1:17 p.m. and end around 4:01 p.m.

Only a partial solar eclipse is expected in the nation’s capital, but there are plenty of open places from which to view it. City rooftops and the National Mall will be packed with people wearing the special viewing glasses.

Trump: Country Being ‘Ripped Apart’ Over Confederate Monuments
President says beauty will be “greatly missed” and can’t be replaced

Police stand in front of protesters as President Donald Trump’s motorcade departs Trump Tower on Wednesday in New York City, amid the continued fallout from his comments on the racial violence in Charlottesville, Va. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump said the history and culture of the United States was being “ripped apart” by the removal of statues and monuments to Confederate leaders across the country.

Trump’s early Thursday tweets came after his earlier remarks that there were “very fine people” on both sides of a protest last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, where white nationalists and neo-Nazi groups violently clashed with counter-protesters over the removal of a statute of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Vernon Ehlers, Former Longtime Michigan Congressman, Dies at 83
Ehlers was known as champion of the Great Lakes and science education

As a congressman from Michigan, Vernon Ehlers used his physics background to advance environmental and STEM legislation for nearly two decades. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

The first research physicist ever elected to Congress, Vernon J. Ehlers was known for his legislative work to bolster scientific research and education, raise fuel economy standards, and protect clean air and water.

Ehlers, who represented Western Michigan in Congress for nearly two decades, died Tuesday at the age of 83. His death was confirmed by the Zaagman Memorial Chapel in Grand Rapids, which did not immediately indicate the cause of death, The Detroit News reported.

Opinion: ‘Medicare for All’ Is the New ‘Repeal and Replace’
Why Democrats may be in danger of repeating the GOP’s mistake

The fine print on “Medicare for All” is much more complex than some Democrats make it out to be, Murphy writes. (ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images file photo)

Even before the horrible events in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend, President Donald Trump was having a bad August.

He had already single-handedly escalated tensions with North Korea to the point that a nuclear strike suddenly seemed like a possibility for the first time in many Americans’ lifetimes.

Pelosi Joins Call for Removal of Confederate Statues From Capitol
Trump says country is being ‘ripped apart’ by removal of ‘beautiful’ monuments

Democrats are calling for the removal from the Capitol of Confederate statues, like this one of Confederate President Jefferson Davis in Statuary Hall. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 12:32 p.m. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Thursday joined a drumbeat from other Democrats, calling for the removal of Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol.

“The halls of Congress are the very heart of our democracy. The statues in the Capitol should embody our highest ideals as Americans, expressing who we are and who we aspire to be as a nation,” the California Democrat said in a statement

Will GOP Divergence From Trump Over White Supremacist Comments Last?
Fissure unlikely to lead to a larger GOP break from president

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has often disagreed with some of the things President Donald Trump has said but is expected to continue working with him in the interests of the GOP's legislative agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Each time President Donald Trump makes an inflammatory comment, on the campaign trail or in the White House, it feels like what could be a breaking point for Republicans. But it never is.

With Trump doubling down on his comments effectively defending some white supremacists on Tuesday, could this be it?

GOP State Senator to Challenge Heitkamp
Heitkamp is one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats

North Dakota state Sen. Tom Campbell is seeking to unseat the state’s junior U.S. senator, Heidi Heitkamp. (Courtesy Campbell’s Facebook page)

North Dakota state Sen. Tom Campbell has decided to challenge Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp for her Senate seat, the state lawmaker confirmed Wednesday. 

Campbell said he made his decision after months of consideration and traveling the state.

Brooks Declines to Endorse Moore or Strange After Conceding Defeat
Congressman announces he will seek re-election after finishing third in Senate race

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., finished third after receiving 20 percent of the vote in the Republican primary Tuesday for Alabama's special election to the U.S. Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mo Brooks is moving on after a distant third-place finish in the Republican primary on Tuesday for the Alabama Senate special election.

And Brooks is doing that without endorsing either of the two men, Judge Roy Moore and appointed Sen. Luther Strange, who beat him to enter a runoff on Sept. 26 to decide the GOP nominee.

Could There Soon Be Another Pence in Washington?
Vice President’s older brother likely to run for Congress in Indiana

Denise and Gary Pence attended President Donald Trump’s inauguration. (Courtesy Denise Pence/Facebook)

Greg Pence starred in a recent candidate announcement video, but it wasn’t for his own campaign — at least not yet.

The older brother of Vice President Mike Pence is the finance chairman of Indiana Rep. Luke Messer’s Senate campaign, and on the day Messer tweeted he was getting in the race, Greg Pence was the one who addressed the camera.

DCCC Raises More Than $6 Million in July
Committee’s fundraising outpaces July 2015

New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján chairs the DCCC, which said it has received contributions from more than 200,000 first-time donors so far this year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee raised more than $6 million in July, roughly $2 million more than it did in July 2015.

The campaign arm of House Democrats raked in $6.26 in July, with 40 percent of donations coming from online contributions, according to figures provided exclusively to Roll Call.