west virginia

Army Lawyer Expected to Challenge Mooney in West Virginia

Democrats are excited about a challenger to Mooney. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With the filing deadline just over a week away, West Virginia Democrats are excited about a young recruit soon expected to announce his candidacy against freshman GOP Rep. Alex Mooney.  

Cory Simpson, an administrative law attorney in the U.S. Army, is transitioning off of active military duty, and will soon be getting in the race for West Virginia's 2nd District, multiple Democratic sources confirmed to Roll Call. Simpson's family is from Charleston, W.Va., but according to his LinkedIn profile, he lives in Silver Spring, Md., where his wife is an active duty Army doctor.  

Gubernatorial Races to Watch in 2016

Democrats in North Carolina are hoping McCrory has overplayed his hand. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images File Photo)

Despite Democrats' surprising victory last week in Louisiana — where state Rep. John Bel Edwards beat Republican Sen. David Vitter in the runoff –  they hold only 18 gubernatorial seats, compared to the 31 held by Republican governors.  

Next year, Democrats will defend eight seats, including ones in targeted U.S. Senate battle grounds such as Missouri and New Hampshire, while Republicans will defend four.  Missouri: With incumbent Democrat Jay Nixon on his way out,  Republicans believe one of their top pickup opportunities is in Missouri, where the chief executive's office has been held by Democrats for all but four of the past 22 years.  

David McKinley Not Running for Governor in West Virginia

McKinley's decision ends speculation about who would run for his seat in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

West Virginia Rep. David McKinley plans to announce Monday that he's not running for governor in 2016, according to two sources with knowledge of McKinley's plans. McKinley plans to make the announcement at a 3:30 p.m. Eastern conference call with reporters.  

The congressman's office declined to comment, but his decision to bow out of the race ends months of speculation about who would take over his safe Republican seat if he left Washington. Mitt Romney and Sen. John McCain carried the district by double-digit margins in 2012 and 2008, respectively. A number of GOP state legislators had expressed interest in the seat. Ahead of McKinley's decision, a number of Democrats were lining up to run, but now that it won't be an open seat, it's unlikely they would stand a chance against the three-term congressman.