West Virginia

Tim Ryan: ‘We’ll See’ About White House Run
Ohio congressman asked in New Hampshire about his long game

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, said he is focused on helping “forgotten America” and workers displaced by globalization. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan did not rule out a White House run when asked over the weekend in New Hampshire if he would pursue the presidency in 2020.

Ryan was invited to speak at New Hampshire’s Young Democrats’ cookout last week, the latest in a round of speeches and campaigning across the country.

Moulton Wants to Change Status Quo by Electing More Vets
Massachusetts Democrat announces new vet endorsements

Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton is a Marine Corps veteran. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Seth Moulton hopes to make two dozen or so endorsements of military veterans challenging Republican House members this cycle.

The Massachusetts Democrat, himself a former Marine who served in Iraq, announced Wednesday he was backing Democratic military vets running for Congress in Minnesota, Kentucky, and West Virginia, joining the eight other endorsements he’s made so far this year.

Senate Republicans Face Key Tax Overhaul Decisions
Effort remains in nascent stages in the face of looming deadlines

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul says the GOP debate over rewriting the tax code pits the establishment, who oppose proposals that would add to the deficit, against conservatives who would “rather see a tax cut.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans have not yet come to a consensus on several crucial decisions that must be made before any serious work begins on legislation to overhaul the U.S. tax code.

Complicating that effort are a number of pressing deadlines the chamber faces, including funding the government past the end of September, the upcoming debt ceiling, and a pending reauthorization of a popular children’s health insurance program. 

Analysis: Health Care Failure to Haunt Republicans Over Recess
Lawmakers call relationship with White House a ‘work in progress’

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders leaves the Capitol on Thursday after the last votes in the Senate before the August recess. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans departed on Thursday for a 32-day recess with key victories overshadowed by a momentous defeat on their effort to overhaul the 2010 health care law.

Lawmakers left Capitol Hill for the extended break after several months of tumult, much of which stemmed from a nascent Trump administration fraught with self-inflicted scandals and lacking in traditional political experience.

Opinion: Forget the Moderates, Only the Die-Hards Can Get Health Care Back on Track
Kennedy and Hatch a great example of working across the aisle

Sens. Orrin G. Hatch of Utah, left, and Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts at a 1997 press conference introducing the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If the failure of health care reform taught us anything last week, it’s that somebody somewhere in Washington is going to have to start compromising if anything is ever going to get done.

But if you’re thinking a successful compromise is going to come from moderates like Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, or Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., think again. Although those senators’ roles will be important, all of the moderates from both parties together still don’t have enough votes to pass legislation.

White House Opioid Panel Pushes Access to Treatment

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, whose state of West Virginia has been ravaged by opiods, says more needs to be done to address the crisis. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

An advisory commission is urging President Donald Trump to declare a national emergency with regard to opioid abuse and addiction, among other recommendations to address a crisis that is claiming upward of 30,000 lives every year.

An emergency declaration “would empower your Cabinet to take bold steps and would force Congress to focus on funding,” said a new draft report from the White House circulated on Monday.

Word on the Hill: Bike Your District
Hiking town hall and BaconFest

West Virginia Rep. Alex X. Mooney tweeted a photo from his bike ride across his district. (Courtesy Mooney’s Twitter page)

Lawmakers often find interesting ways to travel across their states or districts each recess.

Last August, Sen. Christopher S. Murphy, D-Conn., walked across the Nutmeg State, and Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., did a motorcycle tour across the Wolverine State.

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus Is Out
Trump announces that he has named Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly as successor

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus is out as President Donald Trump’s chief of staff.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

By STEPHANIE AKIN and JOHN T. BENNETTUpdated at 7:20 p.m. President Donald Trump has named Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly as his new White House chief of staff, replacing an embattled Reince Priebus.

Trump’s announcement came after a week of turmoil in the White House that had prompted fervent speculation Priebus would be the next to go. But Priebus’s job has been in question almost since the beginning when he was given the almost impossible goal of uniting disparate ideological factions within the Trump administration and serving as a bridge to establishment Republicans.  

Blame It on the Rain: House Departs for August Recess
A rainy last session day in D.C. as captured by Roll Call’s Bill Clark

Arkansas Rep. Bruce Westerman walks down the House steps in the pouring rain on Friday, following the final votes as Congress leaves town for its summer recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

While the Senate is scheduled to stay on in Washington for at least another few days to take care of legislative business, House lawmakers on Friday finished up their final votes ahead of the summer recess.

And it was just in time, too, as heavy downpours hit the nation’s capital, with a D.C. area flash flood watch in effect through Saturday afternoon.

How the ‘Skinny’ Repeal Bill Was Defeated, Play by Play
McCain casts knock-out vote alongside Murkowski and Collins

10:20 p.m. | Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks back to his office from the Senate floor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate went into the wee hours of Friday morning to consider amendments to legislation most Republicans hoped would repeal parts of the 2010 health care law.

The health care effort was attached to a budget process known as reconciliation, which traditionally comes to a conclusion with an all-night vote-a-rama session on the Senate floor, in which members consider dozens of amendments.