West Virginia

Simone Biles Tries to Get Shelley Moore Capito to Dance on TV
Gymnast and her ‘Dancing with the Stars’ partner were in the Capitol for Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day

West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, carrying her 3-year-old grandson Charlie, walks with multiple Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles to an event on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Olympic gymnast Simone Biles tried to put some pressure Thursday on Sen. Shelley Moore Capito to dance on TV.

But Biles and her ‘Dancing with the Stars’ partner Sasha Farber couldn’t quite get through to the West Virginia Republican.

Democrats Make Campaign Issue out of GOP Health Care Proposal
Three Democratic groups launched digital ads Wednesday

Democrats have launched digital ads attacking House Republicans, including New Jersey Rep. Tom MacArthur, who’s behind the latest health care proposal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As soon as House Republicans started talking about another vote on a revised health care plan, Democrats began sharpening their knives.

Both Democratic campaign committees and Priorities USA Action, a major Democratic super PAC, released digital ads Wednesday that accuse Republicans of stripping coverage for Americans with preexisting conditions while exempting themselves.

Decision Day for Avoiding a Government Shutdown?
Appropriators think that decision on another stopgap bill could come today

Appropriations Committee member Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky., a former chairman, says there are still some “knotty issues” to work out on a 2017 spending bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Appropriators think they are close to a deal to fund the government through September, but the hour is fast approaching where a stopgap might be needed to prevent a shutdown at midnight Friday.

Kentucky Rep. Harold Rogers, a former Appropriations chairman and still a senior member of the committee, described the leaders as, “within striking distance” on a fiscal 2017 spending bill.

Life After Capitol Hill: Ex-Staffer Is Connecting D.C. to Silicon Valley
Jamie Corley founded ‘The Bridge’ to serve as a translator

Jamie Corley moved from D.C. to San Francisco in 2015. (Courtesy Jamie Corley)

Is life after Capitol Hill located 3,000 miles away? One former staffer thinks so and wants to bridge the gap between Capitol Hill and Silicon Valley.

“I think a lot of good can come out of [it] if Silicon Valley and Washington D.C. learn how to effectively work together,” said Jamie Corley, 30.

D.C. Area Lawmakers to Colleagues: Leave Our Airport Alone
Warn against easing restrictions on long-haul flights into Reagan National Airport

Lawmakers from the D.C. area are concerned about sending more air traffic to Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers from in and around Washington are warning their congressional colleagues against changing local airport rules in a bid to make it easier for them to get back to their home states.

A group of 15 members of Congress, led by Democratic Sens. Mark Warner and Tim Kaine of Virginia and Benjamin L. Cardin and Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, along with Sen. Joe Manchin III, D-W.Va., do not want to see any easing of restrictions on long-haul flights from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport — whose Arlington, Virginia, location is significantly closer to the Capitol building than either of the other major airports in the area.

Senate GOP Deploys ‘Nuclear Option’ for Supreme Court
Move allows Judge Neil Gorsuch to be confirmed by simple majority

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gives a thumbs up after the Senate invoked the "nuclear option" which will allow for a simple majority vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate took another step Thursday toward doing away with centuries-old traditions that have distinguished it from virtually every other legislative body in the world. 

Senate Republicans moved forward with invoking the “nuclear option” Thursday to make it so a simple majority of senators can confirm any future Supreme Court justice.

Manchin: Pushing for a ‘Full Fix’ on Miner Benefits
December standoff brought only a stopgap deal

From left, Sens. Bob Casey and Joe Manchin III, and Reps. Matt Cartwright and Robert C. Scott conduct a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to introduce miner’s health care legislation the "Black Lung Benefits Improvement Act of 2017" and the "Robert C. Byrd Mine Safety Protection Act of 2017." (Photo by Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The debate over miner health care and pensions that brought the Senate to the precipice of a government shutdown in December might be coming back.

Coal miners from the United Mine Workers have been all over the Capitol meeting with lawmakers in recent weeks.

Senate Moves Closer to Supreme Court Showdown on Gorsuch
Graham: ‘If we have to, we will change the rule and it looks like we’re going to have to.’

Sens. John Kennedy of Louisiana, left, and Thom Tillis of North Carolina listen to Minnesota Sen. Al Franken make a statement during a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting Monday on Judge Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 6:22 p.m. | Long-held Senate rules that require consensus for Supreme Court nominees appear doomed, after enough Democrats announced they would block Judge Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation and force Republicans to alter filibuster rules if they want to put President Donald Trump’s pick on the high court.

The Republican-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee voted 11-9 along party lines Monday, as expected, to favorably advance Gorsuch’s nomination to the Senate floor, but not before key Democrats said they would oppose the 49-year-old federal appeals court judge from Colorado.

Gorsuch Floor Fight Foreshadows Change in Senate
Process likely to become longer, nastier and more political

Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on the second day of his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings on Capitol Hill on March 21. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 4:35 p.m. | A committee vote Monday on Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch will kick off a consequential weeklong confirmation showdown — one that is primed to reshape the Senate and fill the high court seat left vacant for more than a year.

The Senate Judiciary Committee meets to advance Gorsuch’s nomination to the Senate floor, with the panel’s 11-member GOP majority expected to deliver enough votes for a positive report.

Word on the Hill: Smithsonian Update
Learn about Roll Call’s Congressional Staffer Guide

Visitors inside the Smithsonian Natural History Museum. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The free museums that line the National Mall are part of the budget conversation on Capitol Hill, too.

Federal funding covers about 70 cents of every dollar the Smithsonian Institution needs to run, according to the museum group’s website. As part of the federal establishment, the Smithsonian needs to check in with Congress every now and then.