Wyoming

Cathy McMorris Rodgers Not Running for Leadership
Washington Republican will instead seek ranking member subcommittee post on Energy and Commerce

Republican Conference Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers of Washington, has decided not to run for re-election to her leadership position. Instead, she’ll seek a ranking member subcommittee post on the Energy and Commerce Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers has decided not to run for re-election to her leadership position and will instead seek a ranking member subcommittee post on the Energy and Commerce Committee.

McMorris Rodgers had wanted to move up in leadership and was eying the whip position had Republicans won the majority. But since Republicans lost and she did not want to challenge Steve Scalise, she decided to pursue a committee leadership slot rather than seek a fourth term as head of the Republican Conference, according to source familiar with her thinking.

Liz Cheney Announces Run for Republican Conference Chair
Current conference chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers has not yet announced plans

Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., holds the door for Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., as they arrive to hold a news conference following a House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol in March 20. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Freshman Rep. Liz Cheney announced in a letter to her colleagues Wednesday that she is running to chair the House Republican Conference, likely setting up a contested race for what will be the No. 3 position in GOP leadership next year.

Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the current conference chairwoman, has not formally announced her plans yet, but she’s expected to run again for the post.

Virginia’s 5th District A Sign of Democrats’ Expanding House Battlefield
If Leslie Cockburn wins this open GOP seat, it will likely be a good night for Democrats

Leslie Cockburn, the Democrat running for Virginia's 5th Congressional district, speaks with supporters at her local campaign office in Huntly, Va., on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

MADISON, Va. — If Democrat Leslie Cockburn wins the open seat in Virginia’s 5th District Tuesday, the wave election Democrats have hoped for will be in full effect.

The district is part of an expanding Democratic battlefield this cycle, as the party eyes long-held Republican seats that are a stretch to win but ones they feel are gettable with the right candidate and the right investment.

Are Republicans Worried About Holding Virginia’s 5th District?
Scalise campaigns for Republican Denver Riggleman in home stretch but says they’re not concerned

Republican candidate for Virginia’s 5th District, Denver Riggleman, right, introduces House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, left, at a Thursday campaign event for him and Ben Cline, Republican candidate for the 6th District, in Lynchburg, Virginia. (Photo by Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

LYNCHBURG, Va. — Five days before Election Day, a campaign visit from the House’s No. 3 Republican and rising star Steve Scalise might suggest a candidate’s in trouble.

But Scalise and others said that’s not the reason he decided to stump here for Republican Denver Riggleman, who’s running for the open seat in Virginia’s 5th District.

Scalise Won’t Speculate About What Leadership Position He’d Seek In Minority
Majority whip confident that Republicans will defy odds and hold House majority

Majority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., won’t speculate what he’d be doing if the GOP loses the House. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

LYNCHBURG, Va. — Confident that Republicans will defy historical midterm odds and hold onto their House majority, Steve Scalise won’t even speculate about where he sees himself in leadership if the GOP ends up in the minority next year. 

The current House majority whip has ruled out a direct challenge to Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy for speaker if Republicans hold onto the majority. Retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan has endorsed McCarthy to succeed him. 

Senate Republicans Schedule Leadership Elections
Start of lame duck session will also set slate of leaders for 116th Congress

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., center, and behind him from left, his leadership team, Sens. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., John Thune, R-S.D., and John Cornyn, R-Texas, have scheduled leadership elections for Nov. 14. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Win, lose or draw on Election Day, the Senate Republican Conference has formally scheduled leadership elections for the 116th Congress for the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 14.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is the only member of the Republican leadership not facing a conference-imposed term limit on his role. Barring something unforeseen, the Kentuckian is set to lead his conference for the fifth consecutive congress. The 76 year-old McConnell became the longest serving leader of the Republican Conference in June — he was minority leader from 2007 to 2015.

Ethanol Lobbying Is Up, and It Seems to Be Paying Off
Biofuels groups are spending more this year, and they may soon have summer E15 to show for it

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, holds an ear of corn in 2008. As industry groups have lobbied the Trump administration to rethink the Renewable Fuel Standard, lawmakers in the corn belt have applied pressure too. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Biofuel groups upped their spending on lobbying this year as they pressured lawmakers and the Trump administration on issues related to the Renewable Fuel Standard, which sets minimum volumes of biofuels to be used to power cars and trucks.

Some of those efforts appear to be paying off for now, as the Trump administration has proposed to allow year-round sales of gasoline containing 15 percent ethanol, or E15, which is currently prohibited between June and September. The EPA had argued previously that E15 contributes more to summer smog than the more commonly sold gasoline with 10 percent ethanol.

Budget Overhaul Proposals Likely to Stay in Play After Nov. 30
Joint Committee expected to offer recommendations next month

House Budget Chairman Steve Womack, R-Ark., says that proposals that aren’t accepted by other lawmakers could work their way into future legislation. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The legislative proposals under development by the Joint Select Committee on Budget and Appropriations Process Reform could enjoy a life of their own after the special panel’s work is done later this year.

Members of the 16-member bicameral committee are hoping to agree on a package of proposed changes to improve the budget process by a Nov. 30 deadline, allowing their recommendations to be submitted to Congress for action.

Tuesday Is the Voter Registration Deadline in These States
For Maryland and D.C. residents, it’s the last day to register online

The midterm elections are approaching fast and many voter registration deadlines have already passed. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

If you live in one of 18 states and haven’t registered to vote, you’ve already missed your chance to cast a ballot in the midterm elections on Nov. 6.

Other deadlines are fast approaching. Virginia residents, get your postmarks going. Monday is the last day you can register online, in person or by mail.

Senate Republicans Ready to Limp Into Border Wall Fight
With Democratic votes needed, wall funding may not meet what Trump and House GOP want

From left, Sens. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and John Thune, R-S.D., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, conduct a news conference in the Capitol on Wednesday after the policy lunches. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans say they are willing to join their House counterparts in a postelection fight over border wall funding but recognize that their chamber will be more constrained by the need for Democratic votes.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan predicted Monday that there would be a “big fight” in December on appropriating more money for President Donald Trump’s desired wall along the U.S. border with Mexico. The Wisconsin Republican wouldn’t foreshadow how that fight would play out, but he didn’t rule out a partial government shutdown as a potential outcome.