Politics

Senators Keeping Hope — and ‘Regular Order’ — Alive
That immigration debate hasn’t derailed spending may be cause for optimism

Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard C. Shelby and Sen. Roy Blunt are among the lawmakers trying to keep the Senate’s productive streak alive. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Does the Senate’s sudden appetite for “regular order” have any chance of continuing through the summer, particularly when it comes to writing spending bills?

“One only hopes,” Sen. Lindsey Graham said. “Appropriators seem to be able to get along better than other people.”

Analysis: The Wrong Fight at the Wrong Time for the GOP
The more quality of life issues dominate the election cycle, the worse it will be for Republicans

The political consequences of President Donald Trump’s immigration policies could be bad news for his party in November, Rothenberg writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

You need to hand it to President Donald Trump, his entire administration and his party. It takes more than a little chutzpah to act in a way that seems callous to the concerns of children. First, it was gun control. Now it is immigration in general, and separating children from their parents in particular. If this is the way to winning the midterms, it’s hard to see how.

Republicans have talked for decades about crime, drugs, national security, traditional values, the dangers associated with big government and helping businesses produce economic growth.

Democrats Will Make Fairer Districts, Democrats Say
But historically, gerrymandering isn’t just a Republican issue

People demonstrate against partisan gerrymandering outside the Supreme Court last October. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats say there’s one easy way to create more equitable and fair districts throughout the country: Elect more Democrats.

“More Democrats in office will give us fairer lines,” Sabrina Singh, a spokeswoman for the Democratic National Committee, said in an interview before the Supreme Court kicked back two cases on partisan gerrymandering to the lower courts on procedural grounds. 

Jared Golden Wins Democratic Nod to Take On Bruce Poliquin
Ranked-choice voting delayed last week’s primary results

Maine Rep. Bruce Poliquin will face state House Assistant Majority Leader Jared Golden in the fall. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

More than a week after voters went to the polls, the Maine secretary of state on Wednesday night declared state House Assistant Majority Leader Jared Golden the winner of the Democratic nomination in the 2nd District.

Golden will now challenge two-term Republican Rep. Bruce Poliquin in November in a traditionally Democratic district that voted for President Donald Trump in 2016.

GOP Chaos, Confusion Ahead of Thursday Immigration Votes
Prospects for passage appeared poor amid haphazard whip effort

Attorney General Jeff Sessions went to the House to ask Republicans to support the immigration bills the chamber will consider Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Confusion and chaos ensued Wednesday as House Republican leaders conducted a haphazard whip effort on a compromise immigration bill they planned to bring to the floor the next day. The prospects for the bill passing were clearly poor.

The frenetic feel of the day was similar to March 23, 2017. House GOP leaders spent that day engulfed in conversations with members as they tried to whip support for their bill to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law in an effort to vote on the law’s anniversary.

Lawmakers Must Now File Financial Disclosures for Cryptocurrencies
House Ethics Committee rules cryptocurrencies are a form of securities

Rep. Susan Brooks, R-Ind. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Any House members who secretly moonlight as Bitcoin miners received bad news this week after the House Ethics Committee decided cryptocurrencies are subject to financial disclosure requirements for lawmakers and senior congressional staffers.

Cryptocurrencies, including the widely known variety called Bitcoin, are a form of online currency. Transactions made using cryptocurrencies are validated by a decentralized system of computers rather than a centralized bank.

Analysis: Migrants, ‘Rocket Man’ and Trump’s Ever-Changing Mind
Executive order another contradictory move in an ever-changing presidency

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters as he arrives at the Capitol for a meeting on immigration with House Republicans on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump is a hardliner. Until he’s not. Donald Trump is open to compromise. Until he’s not.

The president — yet again — on Thursday reversed himself on a major issue by ending his administration’s practice of separating migrant families. In doing so, he bowed to all kinds of pressure: from his wife and daughter, from human rights groups, from Democratic members — and even from his fellow Republicans.

Why Is Trump Headed to Duluth and Who Is Pete Stauber?
Minnesota’s 8th District is prime GOP pick-up opportunity in November

President Donald Trump, seen here holding a rally in Kentucky last year, is appearing with GOP candidate Pete Stauber in Minnesota’s 8th District Wednesday night. (George LeVines/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With a House map full of potential Democratic pick-up opportunities, Minnesota’s 8th District presents a rare bright spot for Republicans.

President Donald Trump is headed to the sprawling northeast Minnesota district, home to the mining region known as the Iron Range, for a Wednesday night rally in Duluth. Republican candidate Pete Stauber’s campaign said he’ll be speaking too.

Life Is No Picnic: White House Congressional Chowdown Gets Chop
President cancels Thursday evening confab, even as cooks prepared meals

Then House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-Ga., poses with clowns for a picture at the congressional family picnic. July 29, 1996 (Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump announced he will “cancel and postpone” Thursday evening’s congressional picnic at the White House because “we’re all so busy.”

“I was just walking over to the Oval Office and thinking, ‘You know, it just doesn’t feel right to have a picnic for Congress when we’re working on doing something so important.’” 

Trump Signs Executive Action Ending Family Separation
ACLU warns president’s action merely replaces ‘one crisis for another’

Central American asylum seekers wait as U.S. Border Patrol agents take groups of them into custody on June 12, 2018, near McAllen, Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Updated 6:57 p.m. | Bowing to public pressure, President Donald Trump on Thursday signed an executive action ending the practice of separating migrant children from their parents amid a firestorm that saw congressional Republicans break with him.

The president contends Congress must pass legislation addressing the matter for it to be permanently solved given existing laws and court rulings his administration says mandates a process under which migrant children are separated from their parents when caught trying to illegally enter the United States. And it appears families can only be held together for 20 days, unless a federal judge alters a previous ruling placing a limit on detaining migrant families together.

With Family Separation as Backdrop, House Sets in Motion Immigration Votes
Speaker talks up compromise bill as addressing multiple issues in one swoop

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., escorts President Donald Trump to the House Republican caucus meeting in the basement go the Capitol on Tuesday, June 19, 2018 to discuss immigration amid an uproar over family separation at the Southern border. On Thursday, the House will vote on two immigration bills. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As the focus on family separations at the Southern border intensifies, Speaker Paul D. Ryan declined Wednesday to say whether House Republicans would take up standalone legislation to prevent such separations at the border if their broader immigration bill addressing the issue fails.

“Right now we’re focused on passing this bill that’s coming to the floor tomorrow,” the Wisconsin Republican said.

Grimm Compares Migrant Children’s Conditions to ‘Day Care’ Dropoff
Rep. Donovan, who Grimm is challenging for his old seat, also defended family separation policy

Former Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., compared the conditions for migrant children separated from their parents on the border to child day care. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Republican Rep. Michael G. Grimm of New York dismissed the cries of migrant children separated from their families on the border as equivalent to the weeping of kids being dropped off at day care.

“I can take you to any nursery and you’re going to hear the exact same things. As a mother leaves to go to work and has to leave her child at day care, you’re going to hear those exact same things,” Grimm said during an interview with local news media Tuesday.

Poll: Kim Jong Un Looks Stronger Than Trump After Summit
North Korean leader extracted more from the negotiations, respondents say

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un participate in a signing ceremony during a meeting on Sentosa Island in Singapore on June 12. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Kim Jong Un appears stronger than President Donald Trump in the wake of their historic summit, according to a new Economist/YouGov poll.

Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed a week after the meeting said Kim is a strong leader, up from roughly half in April.

Clark Says She Would ‘Politely Decline’ Help From Bill Clinton
Massachusetts congresswoman she hopes other Democrats will follow suit

Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., said she would not help former President Bill Clinton's help on the campaign trail.. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Massachusetts Democratic Rep. Katherine M. Clark said she would say thanks, but no thanks if she was offered help on the campaign trail by former President Bill Clinton.

Speaking on Boston Public Radio, Clark said “I would politely decline” if she were asked.

Man Arrested for Threatening Mast’s Kids Over Immigration Policy
‘If you’re going to separate kids at the border, I’m going to kill his kids,’ caller to congressman’s office says

A man was arrested for threatening to kill the children of Rep. Brian Mast, R-Fla., center, in response to the White House’s family separation policy. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A man from Stuart, Florida, has been arrested after threatening to kill Republican Rep. Brian Mast’s children over President Donald Trump’s family separation policy.

Lawrence Key was arrested after allegedly making a threatening call to Mast’s Washington office on Monday, WPTV reported.