‘Disappointed’ Trump Holds Cards Close on Firing Sessions
AG’s recusal from Russia probe ‘unfair to the presidency,’ Trump gripes

Then-Sen. Jeff Sessions campaigns last year with then-GOP nominee Donald Trump. President Trump would not say Tuesday if he intends to fire now-Attorney General Sessions. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file)

President Donald Trump is holding his cards close on whether he intends to fire Jeff Sessions, his hand-picked attorney general he now worries is too “weak” and “beleaguered” to do the job.

“I am very disappointed with the attorney general,” Trump said in the White House Rose Garden during a joint news conference with his Lebanese counterpart. “He should not have recused himself” from the Justice Department’s Russia election investigation “almost immediately after he took office.”

McConnell-Affiliated Group Hits Brooks for Missing Capitol Police Vote
Senate Leadership Fund Attacks Brooks for missing vote for Capitol Police

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., is receiving criticism for missing a vote to help Capitol Police Officers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A super PAC affiliated with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is attacking Rep. Mo Brooks for skipping a vote to assist Capitol Police officers.

The Senate Leadership Fund blasted out an email criticizing Brooks, who is running for Senate in the special election in Alabama, for missing votes.

Schumer Warns Trump Against Trying to Replace Sessions With Recess Appointment
New York Democrat made remarks on the floor

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is warning against recess appointments. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has not even stepped aside, and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is already warning President Donald Trump against attempting a recess appointment of a replacement in August.

On the floor Tuesday, the New York Democrat said that members of his caucus were prepared to use every means available to prevent a recess appointment to replace Sessions during the break. That likely means the Senate will technically be in session throughout the month, even after the chamber’s scheduled already-extended time in Washington, D.C.

Conservative Groups Come to Sessions’ Defense
Law enforcement groups and officials praise embattled attorney general

Attorney General Jeff Sessions received support from outside conservative organizations amid reports of his job being in jeopardy (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Conservative groups are rushing to Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ defense after repeated criticism from President Donald Trump and reports that his days are numbered.

Jonathan Thompson, CEO and executive director for the National Sheriffs’ Association, praised Sessions for his support of law enforcement.

Sessions on the Cusp of Martyrdom or Oblivion
If he’s fired, will former Senate GOP colleagues draw a line against Trump?

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been the target of almost daily taunting from President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Jeff Sessions was preparing last fall to begin a third decade in the Senate, his future as a rock-ribbed conservative legislative force looked limitless, but just three seasons later, he’s been pushed to the precipice of his career.

The almost daily taunting he’s taking from President Donald Trump points toward one of two probably quick endings to his brief run as attorney general, quitting or getting canned.

Grassley, Feinstein Issue Subpoena for Manafort Testimony
Committee wants Trump campaign chief to appear on Wednesday

Then-GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump (left) and his then-campaign manager Paul Manafort at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland last July. Senators want to hear from Manafort, possibly this week, about Russia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee said Tuesday they saw no choice but to use a subpoena to compel Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, to testify on Wednesday.

Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, and ranking member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said in a statement they were “willing to accommodate” Manafort’s requests to cooperate with the committee’s investigation without appearing at Wednesday’s hearing, but they “were unable to reach an agreement” for his desire to provide “only a single transcribed interview to Congress, which would not be available to the Judiciary Committee members or staff.”

Senate Democrats Wage Eleventh-Hour Twitter War on GOP Health Care Bill
Vote Tuesday decides whether chamber moves ahead with Obamacare repeal

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., was one of a slew of Democrats to take part in a late Twitter flurry against the GOP health care overhaul ahead of a momentous vote to proceed Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats in the last 24 hours have launched a furious volley of attacks against their colleagues across the aisle ahead of the vote Tuesday on whether to proceed with the GOP health care bill that would dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

The Democrats hope Twitter is their Agincourt and tweets their arrows.

Trump Slams Sessions Amid Talk of Firing Him
Asked if Trump wants Sessions gone, Scaramucci says, ‘Yeah, you’re probably right’

President Donald Trump has referred to Attorney General Jeff Sessions as “beleaguered.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump took aim at Attorney General Jeff Sessions Tuesday in an early morning tweet amid reports that the president has consulted his advisers about firing him.

And his newly appointed communications director, Anthony Scaramucci, acknowledged later Tuesday that Trump wants Sessions out.

Trump Sees Power in Twitter — but Not to Sell Health Care Bill
Since House bill passage, under 10 percent of president’s tweets about health care

As Senate Republicans have struggled to put together their health care legislation, some in the GOP have hoped the president would provide some air coverage through his social media accounts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump unleashed a Twitter barrage in recent days, reflective of a larger trend that is rankling some Republicans: He has fired off notably more tweets about Russia than ones intended to help sell a Senate Republican health care bill.

Trump is quick to defend his Twitter habit as his best tool to directly reach the American people. Yet, since Senate Republicans grabbed the health care baton in early May, the president has devoted less than 10 percent of his tweets to the measure that is unpopular with the public.

Opinion: Democrats Cut the Cards in Search of a Better Deal
Sending a message to Joe Sixpack

From left, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Rhode Island Rep. David Cicilline, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen, New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján, Virginia Sen. Mark Warner and Illinois Rep. Cheri Bustos at the congressional Democrats’ rally in Berryville, Va., on Monday to unveil their new economic agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Under the bright sun in Berryville, Virginia, Monday afternoon, the congressional Democrats demonstrated that they can change. Or, at least, they can paper over their differences.

At the beginning of an hourlong rollout of their 2018 economic agenda, “A Better Deal,” Chuck Schumer labeled as a “false choice” the debate over “whether Democrats should spend all our energy focusing on the diverse Obama coalition or the blue-collar Americans in the heartland who voted for Trump.”

Capitol Ink | Court Jester

Trump Turns Bully Pulpit on Senate Republicans
President says it is time to vote on health care measure

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., along with Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, are looking for the votes to advance their health care measure. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump turned up the heat on his own party Monday when he sent a blunt message to Senate Republicans: end years of merely talking about overhauling Barack Obama’s health law and send him a bill to get it done.

“There has been enough talk and no action. Now is the time for action,” Trump said in a Monday afternoon statement ahead of a planned Tuesday Senate vote on whether to officially take up a health bill.

Trump Returning to Rallies After West Wing Shake-Up, Kushner Testimony

It’s a busy week at the White House following Friday’s West Wing shake-up with the appointment of Anthony Scaramucci as communications director and the resignation of press secretary Sean Spicer. President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner is on the Hill on Monday to testify behind closed doors about his meeting with a Russian lawyer during the 2016 campaign, shortly before the president heads back to the campaign trail with a rally in Youngstown, Ohio. See the video for Roll Call White House reporter John T. Bennett’s analysis of the week ahead.