Katherine Tully-McManus

Suspicious substance investigated outside of Schiff’s office
Capitol Police cleared the incident just before noon

A suspicious substance was found outside lead House impeachment manager Adam B. Schiff’s congressional office Thursday morning but was ultimately deemed not hazardous and cleared by the Capitol Police, casting a cloud of grim reality over Schiff’s earlier comments expressing grave concern for his staffers.

The incident comes just a day after President Donald Trump was acquitted by the Senate in his impeachment trial on both charges: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Schiff, a California Democrat, spent days presenting the case for Trump’s removal from office.

Senate votes to acquit Trump on both impeachment charges
Romney only defector in either party

The Senate on Wednesday acquitted President Donald Trump on two articles of impeachment, swiftly ending months of investigation and public arguments that ultimately changed few minds on Capitol Hill. 

The Senate voted 48-52 to reject the House’s abuse of power charge and 47-53 to reject the obstruction of Congress charge. A two-thirds majority of the Senate is required for conviction.

Network overhaul shores up House Wi-Fi for State of the Union
Bandwidth boosted after years of unreliable access

A massive revamp of internet infrastructure in the House chamber and press galleries ahead of Tuesday’s State of the Union was born out of chaos in preceding years and aimed to facilitate improved media coverage of the speech, spin and surrounding pomp and circumstance.

It seemed to make a difference Tuesday, allowing reporters to fire off tweets and file story updates during the speech from inside the chamber. That hasn’t been the case in previous years and was a pleasant surprise for those in the chamber.

View from the gallery: Senators pack up desks as impeachment trial nears its end
Chamber takes on a last-day-of-school vibe

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer tightly hugged Rep. Adam B. Schiff just after the closing argument in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, and spoke directly into the House lead manager’s ear for about 10 seconds.

Before the New York senator let go, he gave Schiff three loud pats on the back, as a line of other Senate Democrats waited to hug the California Democrat or shake his hand.

House managers, Trump lawyers appeal to the other side in closing arguments
Trump’s ultimate acquittal on Wednesday is a near certainty

Attorneys for both sides in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Monday wrapped up their arguments with pleas for bipartisanship ahead of the Wednesday vote to acquit the president.

After House Democrats rehashed their well-known arguments for convicting the president on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, lead House manager Adam B. Schiff of California called on Senate Republicans to have the courage to remove Trump from office.

View from the gallery: Restless senators eager to flee impeachment court for weekend
Chief justice silences senators for the first time in the trial

Arkansas Republican Tom Cotton accidentally voted the wrong way on a procedural vote late Friday during President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, so when he got the next vote right he turned to his colleagues and took a dramatic bow.

Georgia Republican David Perdue missed his queue to vote twice because he was chatting with Texas Republican Ted Cruz, who offered to take the blame.

With Alexander a ‘no’ on witnesses, impeachment trial enters stretch run
Moderates’ queries hint at remaining hangups they have about the case

Senators used their second and final day of questioning in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump to tee up debate on whether to subpoena documents and witnesses that did not appear during the House’s inquiry. The late-night announcement that Tennessee Republican Lamar Alexander will vote against additional witnesses Friday signals there likely won’t be enough votes to continue the trial much longer. 

After senators exhausted their cumulative 16-hour Q&A session with House managers and Trump’s lawyers, Alexander, who will retire at the end of this term, announced he would vote against hearing from new witnesses.

View from the gallery: Impeachment trial end in sight, senators fight common cold
Outside the chamber and in galleries, much talk of the “Senate plague”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell stood up to send a question to President Donald Trump’s defense team around 6:45 p.m. Thursday, but first he suggested an upcoming 45-minute break for dinner.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., instead of his usual response of “without objection,” changed it to a phrase that resonated with the haggard senators and others in the chamber. “I’m sure there’s no objection,” Roberts said, causing a murmur of laughter to spread even to the page delivering the paper card with McConnell’s question to the rostrum.

First day of Trump trial Q&A yields some questions lawyers simply can’t answer
Whistleblower questions pose challenges for both sides

The first day of questions and answers in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump raised some questions that each side either couldn’t, or wouldn’t, answer. 

While many of the questions centered on well-trodden topics, some highlighted the boundaries that the House impeachment managers and the Trump defense team would not cross.

View from the gallery: Senators swap notes and jockey for questions at Trump trial
Aides hold office hours in the back of the chamber while Senate pages log their steps for the day

Mississippi Republican Roger Wicker approached a member of President Donald Trump’s legal team on the floor Wednesday and loudly asked: “You’re not packing up to leave, are you?”

Former Harvard University law professor Alan Dershowitz had gathered a small crowd of Republican senators around the desk of Mike Lee of Utah during the dinner break, and Wicker wanted to elbow in when the impeachment trial restarted.

Impeachment press pass pops up on eBay
Item no longer available on site by late Wednesday

Updated 10:16 p.m. | At least one press credential granting media access to the Senate during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump has been spotted for sale on eBay for $710. However, the item was no longer on the site by late Wednesday.

A media “overlay” must be paired with a hard press pass to enter the Senate portion of the Capitol during the impeachment proceeding. And, to get into the viewing gallery, the reporter must also have a ticket dated with the current day.

Trump trial enters the question-and-answer phase
Senators on both sides draft questions aimed at bolstering their cases for or against conviction

Senators will finally get to actually participate — at least by proxy — in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Wednesday after long days and nights of just listening to presentations from House impeachment managers and the president’s own attorneys.

The Senate will spend up to eight hours each on Wednesday and Thursday on written questions submitted by senators and read aloud by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., alternating the questioning between the minority and majority. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that during the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton, senators were “thoughtful and brief in their questions” and that House managers and the president's counsel were “succinct in their answers.”

View from the gallery: Lots of cross-party talk — and cross-contamination — at Senate trial
Mitt Romney finds a loophole in the beverage rule

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York sat still at his desk as President Donald Trump’s defense team played a montage of decades-old statements from Democrats regarding Bill Clinton’s impeachment.

It ended with a clip of Schumer, then a House member, warning against the dangers of partisan impeachment. 

Trump’s legal team quickly wraps defense of president at impeachment trial
Defense argued Tuesday that Democrats were playing politics with impeachment powers

Donald Trump’s attorneys utilized just 10 of the 24 hours allotted to them to defend the president against two articles of impeachment charging him with obstruction of Congress and abuse of power, concluding their three-day presentation Tuesday by arguing that Democrats’ case amounted merely to politics.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone closed the defense’s case by urging senators to consider their role and the lasting impact that their decision could make on American history.

View from the gallery: Senators’ personal habits on full display as week 2 begins
One senator picked his nose, while an attorney swiped a souvenir

Tennessee Republican Lamar Alexander fought off sleep as President Donald Trump’s legal team discussed a history of subpoena litigation, eyes closed, his cheek resting on his hand, his chin sometimes dropping toward his orange sweater.

When Deputy White House counsel Patrick Philbin announced he was ready to wrap up his portion of Trump’s presentation, Alexander studied his watch.

Dershowitz argues Trump cannot be convicted without a criminal offense
President’s legal team focuses heavily on Bidens in Day 5 of impeachment trial

Alan Dershowitz, former Harvard Law School professor and controversial defense attorney, made his debut in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Monday with a deep history lesson and argument that the president cannot be convicted without an actual criminal offense.

Trump’s defense team teased Dershowitz’s arguments more than once throughout the day, like the evening news promotes its big story. And it was not an accident that the star consultant on the Trump defense team landed in primetime.

Impeachment managers attempt to preempt Trump’s defense
Trump, Lindsey Graham used to bolster case for removal

Regardless of whether Democratic impeachment managers get to call witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, they are already making their case by using the president’s own words — and even those of a prominent Republican senator — in dramatic fashion in the Senate chamber. 

The managers focused much of their arguments Thursday on the abuse of power charge the House used to condemn Trump, citing history and attempting to poke preemptive holes in the defense team’s upcoming arguments.

View from the gallery: Senators sit, spin and fidget during Trump trial
They found more ways to pass time during second day of opening presentations

Sen. Bill Cassidy charted a course along the back corner of the Senate chamber Thursday during President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. The Louisiana Republican walked through an area usually reserved for staff seating, hands in pockets, retracing a short path over and over again for more than 15 minutes.

When Georgia Republican David Perdue took to standing along his path, Cassidy squeezed by and just kept pacing.

View from the gallery: Senators seek comfort and novelty during Trump trial
Senators decamp to cloakrooms, bring blankets, and sip on milk and water

Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton was among the first senators spotted ordering milk to the Senate chamber for President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial Wednesday, and he took small sips to wash down what looked like a Hershey’s chocolate bar.

This was the second day of the third presidential impeachment trial in U.S. history, and the 100 senators began to search in earnest for comfort and novelty during eight hours of opening statements from House managers.

House managers stick to script on first day of Trump trial arguments
Democrats lean heavily on witness testimony over eight hours on the Senate floor

House impeachment managers on Wednesday dutifully stayed on message throughout the second full day of the Senate impeachment trial, arguing that the findings of the House’s impeachment inquiry provide ample evidence to warrant the removal of President Donald Trump from office.

The team of seven managers took turns presenting their case, starting with House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff, who led the impeachment inquiry.