rules-and-procedure

Rise of fintech weakens law to prevent lending discrimination
The number of bank branches with a Community Reinvestment Act obligation to provide loans and other services is falling

The growth of online banking has poked some holes in the Community Reinvestment Act. (Ali Balikci/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images file photo)

As online banking threatens to make in-person banking at brick-and-mortar branches as archaic as video rental stores, it may do the same to a 1977 law created to counteract decades of underinvestment in minority neighborhoods.

The Community Reinvestment Act was Congress’ response all those years ago to redlining — the practice of discriminatory lending that denied or offered more expensive credit to minorities and the poor and led to urban blight and white flight from city centers.

McCarthy asks Pelosi to suspend impeachment inquiry until she defines procedures
Minority leader says Democrats are limiting Republican participation and not following precedent

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., has asked Speaker Nancy Pelosi to suspend Democrats' impeachment inquiry until she defines procedures to govern it. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy sent a letter Thursday to Speaker Nancy Pelosi requesting she suspend Democrats’ impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump “until transparent and equitable rules and procedures are established to govern the inquiry.”

“Unfortunately, you have given no clear indication as to how your impeachment inquiry will proceed — including whether key historical precedents or basic standards of due process will be observed,” the California Republican wrote. “In addition, the swiftness and recklessness with which you have proceeded has already resulted in committee chairs attempting to limit minority participation in scheduled interviews, calling into question the integrity of such an inquiry.”

Impeachment news roundup: Oct. 3
The latest on the impeachment inquiry

(Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Pharma fight: President Donald Trump told supporters in Florida during a health policy speech he “wouldn’t be surprised” if any of the “hoax” investigations he has faced or is facing originated from sectors like the pharmaceutical industry, which he has pushed to change business practices. Moments earlier, he said he had told his staff of drug companies: “Let their stock prices go down” as long as prescription drug prices could be curbed.

Pump the brakes: House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Thursday sent a letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi requesting she suspend Democrats’ impeachment investigation into Trump “until transparent and equitable rules and procedures are established to govern the inquiry.”

McConnell says he can’t completely prevent an impeachment trial
Duration, however, is ‘a whole different matter’

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was pushing for the new trade agreement with Canada and Mexico on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell reiterated on Monday that he is bound by Senate rules to take up articles of impeachment if they are presented by the House.

“Under the Senate rules, we’re required to take it up if the House does go down that path, and we’ll follow the Senate rules,” McConnell said. “It’s a Senate rule related to impeachment that would take 67 votes to change.”

Capitol Ink | Impeachment March

White House: Trump supports stopgap funding bill
Funding measure would keep government running until Nov. 21

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before departing from the White House on Sept. 16 in Washington. (Chen Mengtong/China News Service/VCG via Getty Images)

President Donald Trump plans to sign the stopgap spending bill that the Senate is expected to send him this week, a senior White House official said Monday. That would avoid another partial government shutdown for now, though the fight over border wall spending and other partisan hangups will simply be punted 51 days, to just before Thanksgiving. 

The continuing resolution passed the House by a vote of 301-123 last week, which eclipsed the number necessary to override a potential presidential veto. That doesn’t appear to be a likely scenario now, though it remains uncertain whether the president will change his mind. The Senate’s veto override threshold is 67 votes.

Capitol Ink | Philosophical Question

Member lapel pins out, necklaces in, say women in Congress
Fashion sense, practicality cited as reasons for growing trend

Florida Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell says people are noticing female lawmakers wearing their member pins as necklace pendants because there are more women in the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

While big jewelry and bold statement chains made headlines last week during New York Fashion Week, an increasing number of women in the House are starting a fashion trend of their own: wearing their member pins as a necklace pendant.

Traditionally, the House member pin, given out to lawmakers to distinguish them from staffers and visitors, is worn pierced through fabric as its menswear name suggests — on a suit lapel. While members are not required to wear them, the pins can be an easy way for the Capitol Police to identify the freshman class of lawmakers each Congress — or perhaps some of the more obscure members of the House.

House Judiciary approves procedures for impeachment query
Nadler says hearings will start next week with former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-New York, left, and ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Georgia, are seen during a House Judiciary Committee hearing titled "Lessons from the Mueller Report, Part II: Bipartisan Perspectives," in Rayburn Building in June. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Judiciary Committee on Thursday agreed to a resolution for procedures related to an investigation into the possible impeachment of President Donald Trump, as Democrats and Republicans deeply were split over whether it meant anything at all.

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-New York, allowed that “there has been a good amount of confusion” about how the committee should talk about the ever-broadening investigation into allegations that Trump committed crimes and abused the power of his office.

Term limit rules targeted by Trump aren’t tipping scale on House GOP retirements
POTUS wants to discourage retirements, but life in the minority is also a factor

President Trump blamed the wave of retirements on a GOP conference rule that term limits committee chairmen. Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, is one member who said losing his top committee spot impacted his choice to not seek reelection. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump has an idea he thinks would quell the growing list of House Republicans who say they won’t run for another term, but the president’s proposal might not get to the root of the GOP retirements.

In a tweet early Monday, Trump urged House GOP leaders to alter conference rules to allow committee chairs (and ranking members if in the minority) to hold their posts for more than six years.