technology

Rise of fintech weakens law to prevent lending discrimination
The number of bank branches with a Community Reinvestment Act obligation to provide loans and other services is falling

The growth of online banking has poked some holes in the Community Reinvestment Act. (Ali Balikci/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images file photo)

As online banking threatens to make in-person banking at brick-and-mortar branches as archaic as video rental stores, it may do the same to a 1977 law created to counteract decades of underinvestment in minority neighborhoods.

The Community Reinvestment Act was Congress’ response all those years ago to redlining — the practice of discriminatory lending that denied or offered more expensive credit to minorities and the poor and led to urban blight and white flight from city centers.

Fintech Beat explores how Uber is much more than a ride sharing company
Uber meets Fintech, Ep. 23

A man waits for a ride-hailing service at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

What is Uber? It's not just a ride share company and definitely more than a technology company. Increasingly, it's a fintech company, too. We speak to the CEO of Uber Payments LLC and Uber's associate counsel to explore the company's identity. 

Trump announces 'substantial' trade deal with China - but it's weeks from being final
U.S. won't raise some existing tariffs to 30 percent, Mnuchin says

A container ship sits docked at the Port of Oakland on May 13, 2019, in Oakland, California. Chinese and U.S. officials, after trading tariffs and barbs for months, are again negotiating toward a potential trade pact. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Friday announced his administration has reached a “substantial” trade pact with China that includes some backing off of tariffs, but he signaled work remains to finalize the elusive pact.

The Trump administration has agreed to keep existing tariffs on billions of dollars in Chinese-made goods at current levels rather than raising them to 30 percent, as Trump had threatened to when talks previously stalled.

Fintech Beat examines Block.one's settlement with the SEC
Fintech Beat, Ep. 22

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at the SEC in Washington. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Uncertainty is the bane of the crypto industry, with limited predictability about the scope of securities laws. That's because there is little agreement on when a cryptocurrency is considered a security. Block.one found out the hard way. Fintech Beat explores what the company's settlement with the SEC means.

Supreme Court term to be punctuated by presidential politics
Docket ‘almost guarantees’ court shifting further and faster to the right, expert says

Activists hold up signs at an abortion-rights rally at Supreme Court in Washington to protest new state bans on abortion services on Tuesday May 21, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court will confront ideological issues such as immigration and LGBT rights that have sharply divided Congress and the nation in a new term starting Monday that will bring more scrutiny to the justices during a heated presidential campaign season.

In many ways, the nine justices are still settling into a new internal dynamic with two President Donald Trump appointees in as many years. The court had few high-profile cases last term, amid the drama of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation that gripped the nation and solidified the court’s conservative ideological tilt.

FCC’s O’Rielly sees risk in ruling letting states set net neutrality rules
A court decision upholding the scrapping of net neutrality rules could lead to more litigation and a patchwork of U.S. laws

Congressional Democrats hold a news conference in the Capitol in March 2019, announcing legislation restoring net neutrality protections after the FCC scrapped the Obama-era rules. The bill passed in the House but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said it would not advance in the Senate. A court Tuesday upheld the FCC's right to overturn the rules. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A federal appeals court decision upholding the Federal Communications Commission’s scrapping of net neutrality rules in 2017 and allowing states to set their own could lead to state-by-state regulations and more litigation, Commissioner Michael O’Rielly said in a C-SPAN interview taped Tuesday for later broadcast.

The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals said Tuesday that the commission and Chairman Ajit Pai were right to overturn Obama administration rules that prohibited internet providers like AT&T and Verizon from giving favorable treatment such as higher-speed delivery to specific content creators — including those they may own or have a stake in. It would also prohibit access providers from charging more for specific content creators such as Netflix.

Fintech Beat explores the difference between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ money
Fintech Beat, Ep. 21

Amid impeachment inquiry, Trump again publicly contradicts a senior aide
President, top trade rep disagree on U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade pact's fate

President Donald Trump, facing an impeachment inquiry by House Democrats, shot down his trade representative Robert Lighthizer’s optimism that the House would vote on a proposed trade agreement with Canada and Mexico. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump openly disagreed with his top trade representative after Robert Lighthizer expressed confidence the House would vote on a proposed U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade pact even while Democrats conduct an impeachment inquiry.

“I don't know if Nancy Pelosi is going to have time to sign it,” Trump said of the speaker, according to a pool report. “I don't know whether or not [we] have time to do any deals.”

Trump’s UN speech shows a departure from John Bolton’s muscular worldview
President’s speech could be called ‘Bolton Lite’ as he urges dictators to ‘love’ their people

Then-National Security Adviser John Bolton, center, and U.S. Ambassador to Poland Georgette Mosbacher, right, attend an international ceremony in Warsaw to commemorate the 80th anniversary of the outbreak of World War II on Sept. 1. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump went to the United Nations General Assembly without his former national security adviser, the hawkish John Bolton, and delivered a speech that might be dubbed “Bolton Lite.”

Bolton was ousted after a series of disagreements, including one over Trump’s scuttled Afghanistan peace summit that would have put Taliban leaders at Camp David just days before the 18th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks their al-Qaeda guests planned from the southwest Asian country.

Trump: House Dems moving toward impeachment because ‘they can’t stop me’
President admits holding up massive military aid package to Ukraine — but blames Europe

President Donald Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump, speaks to the media at the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday in New York. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday called it “ridiculous” that additional House Democrats considering impeachment proceedings against him, saying they are doing so only because they cannot defeat him at the ballot box.

The president also acknowledged that he had withheld a nearly $300 million military aid package meant to help Ukraine defend against Russia. But on Tuesday he claimed he did so because European countries need to contribute more to Ukraine’s defense.