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Polling impeachment and remembering Elijah Cummings
CQ on Congress, Ep. 172

A memorial for the late House Oversight and Reform Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., is seen in the committee’s Rayburn Building hearing room on. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Polls now show a majority of Americans favor impeaching President Donald Trump and removing him from office. Democratic pollster Brad Bannon explains how people should read the rush of new surveys coming in. We also remember Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Maryland Democrat who passed away this week, by reprising his 2017 interview with CQ Roll Call.

Elijah E. Cummings in Congress, 1996-2019
Take a look back at his career

Rep. Elijah Cummings in 1996 (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Thirteen-term Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., died Thursday at the age of 68, after complications arising from longtime health issues, according to a statement from his office. He found himself in the national spotlight frequently in his role as the chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, but most recently as a strong voice in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. 

Rep. Elijah Cummings fondly remembered by Democrats, Republicans
‘No better friend than Elijah Cummings,’ GOP Rep. Mark Meadows says of late Maryland Democrat

Then-ranking member Elijah Cummings laughs with then-chairman Jason Chaffetz during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee meeting at the beginning of the 115th Congress in 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Elijah Cummings, who died Thursday after longtime health complications, threaded a needle that few recent chairmen and chairwomen of high-profile investigative committees have been able to manage: He remained widely popular among his colleagues on both sides of the aisle.

As chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform over the last 10 months and a key player in the ongoing impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, Cummings has been on the receiving end of a stream of invective from a frustrated White House.

Power struggle begins atop the House Appropriations Committee
CQ Budget, Ep. 129

Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., speaks with reporters as she leaves a House Democratic caucus meeting in the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

'There was a lot of blood coming out,' witness says after stabbing near Capitol

A police officer talks on his cell phone at the scene of a stabbing Friday afternoon at the Capitol South Metro station. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Washington is trapped in a bad spy novel
Impeachment messaging battle is important for GOP, but so is keeping focus on its economic wins

A national conversation between Republicans and voters about how it has cut taxes and regulations, reduced unemployment and increased wages would put in proper context Democrats’ focus on investigation, impeachment and raw politics, Winston writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — It’s been a bad week in Washington and it’s not likely to get any better soon. In fact, it’s beginning to feel like the whole town and everyone in it is trapped in a really bad spy novel.

People are confused by what’s become a three-year plot that gets harder and harder to follow. They’re not sure who’s a good guy or a bad guy, and they’re worried that the whole thing won’t end well.

CBP Chief: Harassing journalists 'absolutely unacceptable'

Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan talks to reporters in the James Brady Press Briefing Room Tuesday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Mark Morgan, the acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, told reporters at the White House on Tuesday that it is “absolutely unacceptable” for his officers to stop a journalist “because they’re a journalist.” He was responding to a question, based in part, on an Oct. 3 incident between Defense One editor Ben Watson and a CBP officer at Dulles International Airport. Defense One’s report on the exchange alleged that “A U.S. passport screening official held a Defense One journalist’s passport until he received an affirmative answer to this repeated question: ‘You write propaganda, right?’” and characterized the officer’s actions as harassment.

The question in Tuesday’s briefing came from Andrew Feinberg, who said this was one of a number of such incidents involving CBP officers over the last year.

Owner of Capitol Hill ‘fundraising’ townhouse abandons zoning fight
Neighbors complain the residence serves as a D.C. outpost for Virginia-based firm

Jamie Hogan, owner of the house at 224 C St. NE, talks about his plans for his garage on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019. Facing neighborhood opposition, Hogan has dropped his plans. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The owner of a Capitol Hill townhouse that has sparked controversy about the commercialization of residential zones near Congress has withdrawn his application for a project that prompted opposition from neighbors.

But that may not be the end of the matter. 

Fintech Beat examines Block.one's settlement with the SEC
Fintech Beat, Ep. 22

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission at the SEC in Washington. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Uncertainty is the bane of the crypto industry, with limited predictability about the scope of securities laws. That's because there is little agreement on when a cryptocurrency is considered a security. Block.one found out the hard way. Fintech Beat explores what the company's settlement with the SEC means.

House vote likely on creation of women’s history museum
‘If every woman gave a $1, we’d have this built in no time,’ Carolyn Maloney says

Members of the American Equal Rights Association pose for a photograph at their executive committee meeting. Advocates for a national women’s history museum see 2020 — the 100th anniversary of the the ratification of the 19th Amendment — as a rallying point for its creation. (Courtesy Library of Congress)

For 20 years, proponents in and out of Congress have sought the creation of a national museum devoted to women’s history, and a new bipartisan push will likely get the matter a vote in the House this fall.

Last month, a bill to establish such a museum crossed the 290 co-sponsorship threshold that allows for fast-track floor consideration under what is known as the consensus calendar. The measure could be scheduled for a vote by November.