Capitol Police

Watch: Capitol Police are ‘West Wing’ fans, too
What’s next? President Bartlet is on the Hill

Martin Sheen is seen on the center steps of the Capitol before being arrested during a weekly rally with Jane Fonda to call for action on climate change Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Protesters and police in disarray amid anti-Trump demonstrations

Protesters participate in the "Swarm the Senate" rally in the Hart Senate Office Building urging action to "impeach, remove, indict and jail" President Trump on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Staffers gripe about lack of communication during Capitol lockdown
House sergeant-at-arms acknowledges missteps regarding suspicious aircraft incident

Staffers are criticizing the lack of response from the Capitol Police amid Tuesday’s lockdown (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After reports of a possible aircraft in restricted airspace over Washington on Tuesday, U.S. Capitol Police halted access to Capitol grounds. But a lack of communication left staffers confused and in the dark.

Although the lockdown lasted nearly 50 minutes and was “cleared without incident,” according to a Capitol Police statement, several staffers relied on social media and word of mouth for information.

Watch: Rodney Davis and Eleanor Holmes Norton show off their scooter skills (or lack thereof)
Holmes Norton is an advocate for allowing electric scooters on the Capitol campus

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton tries out an e-scooter at a Capitol Hill safety demonstration on Wednesday. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call).

Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., attended an e-scooter safety demonstration on Capitol Hill Wednesday afternoon, hosted by the Micromobility Coalition. Holmes Norton is an advocate of allowing e-scooters on the Capitol campus.

“Let’s bring the Congress into the 21st century,” she said Wednesday.

Paying respects to Elijah Cummings at the Capitol? Here’s what you need to know
Crowds expected to honor the late Democratic congressman from Baltimore

A memorial for the late House Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah E. Cummings. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The public can pay its respects on Thursday, Oct. 24, as Maryland Rep. Elijah E. Cummings lies in state in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall between 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Public viewing will follow a private ceremony at 11 a.m.

Visitors must enter through the Capitol Visitor Center on the East Front of the Capitol. Attendees can start lining up Thursday morning on First Street Northwest and Southwest, between Constitution and Independence avenues, or on Second Street Northeast and Southeast, between East Capitol Street and Independence Avenue Southeast.

Protesters, Laverne Cox rally outside Supreme Court during LGBTQ cases
The high court heard cases on LGBTQ discrimination on Tuesday

A protester dressed up as Dorothy from the “Wizard of Oz” holds a sign in front of the Supreme Court as it hears arguments on whether gay and transgender people are covered by a federal law barring employment discrimination on the basis of sex on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Protesters in support of LGBTQ rights rallied outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday as the high court heard arguments in several cases dealing with discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

Actress Laverne Cox joined the demonstration, calling on lawmakers to pass legislation to protect LGBTQ people if the Supreme Court doesn’t rule in their favor. According to a spokesperson for U.S. Capitol Police, 133 individuals were arrested for unlawfully demonstrating.

The Mean Machine celebrates on House floor

The trophy for the Congressional Football Game for Charity sits on the field Tuesday as a team made up of lawmakers and former NFL players faced current and former members of the Capitol Police. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Man who sought internship with Rep. Velázquez later threatened to shoot her
Queens man was arrested by NYPD on Wednesday

Rep. Nydia Velázquez, D-N.Y., was the target of a shooting threat last week, according to her office. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Queens, New York, man has been arrested for threatening to shoot Rep. Nydia Velázquez. Less than 48 hours earlier, he had sought an internship with the longtime New York Democrat.

New York police arrested Luke Nammacher on Wednesday, the New York Daily News reported, after authorities were able to trace a call he made last Friday to Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office in which he said he had a “friend” who wanted to shoot Velázquez.

Who protects whom? Depends on presidential candidate, congressional status
Kamala Harris incident in San Francisco prompts campaign security concerns

Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., received Secret Service protection when he ran for president in May 2007, more than a year out from the general election. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

When a protester walked onstage and took the microphone from California Sen. Kamala Harris at an event earlier this month, it raised serious questions about who is in charge of protecting the Democratic presidential candidate and at what point in her campaign — and others’ — the Secret Service should step in. 

Harris remained calm, and security personnel at MoveOn’s Big Ideas Forum in San Francisco leaped onstage as the senator walked away. Harris’ husband, Douglas Emhoff, wrestled the microphone from the protester. But the incident brought with it a flurry of concern about how vulnerable candidates can be on the trail, and who is responsible for protecting them.

Sund named as acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police
Former Metropolitan Police Department commander steps into top role at USCP

U.S. Capitol Police Assistant Chief Steven Sund, left, and U.S. Capitol Police Chief Matthew Verderosa place flowers in honor of fallen police officer during the Washington Area Law Enforcement Memorial Service on May 6, 2019. On Friday Sund was named as acting chief after Verderosa announced he would retire. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Capitol Police Board has appointed Assistant Chief Steven A. Sund as the acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police.

Sund takes over on Saturday for Chief Matthew Verderosa who announced his retirement after a 34-year career in law enforcement and three as chief of USCP. The order promoting Sund to chief was signed Friday by the members of the board.