impeachment

Hakeem Jeffries responds to protester disrupting Senate impeachment trial

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., at a press conference in April 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A protester in the Senate gallery interrupted Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., shortly before the Senate Court of Impeachment’s dinner break at 6:30 p.m., by yelling comments at the senators seated a floor below.

The comments were not audible in their in entirety, but the protester could be heard yelling “Jesus Christ” and “Schumer is the devil” before being removed.

What to watch during impeachment: Napping senators
Things are getting soporific in the Senate chamber

Capitol workers wind the Ohio Clock in the Ohio Clock Corridor in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

“Spot the snoozing politician” is pretty much an annual tradition at the State of the Union. Now there’s a new chance to play the game.

As President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial continues, lawmakers are slouching, yawning and fidgeting — and observers in the gallery are watching for drooping eyelids.

Managing impeachment: Sensenbrenner’s seen it before
Wisconsin Republican was an impeachment manager in Clinton trial

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner R-Wis., and Bill McCollum, R-Fla., talk with reporters near Statuary Hall at the end of the first full day of the 1999 impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The opening arguments for President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial took 2½ days. Rep. Henry Hyde needed his opening arguments to be shorter in President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial.

Reporter’s Notebook: Precedent, the reason Senate rules feel ‘made up’

Niels Lesniewski talks about his deep dive into the 1936 impeachment of a federal judge from Florida. (Graham MacGillivray/CQ Roll Call)

CQ Roll Call reporter Niels Lesniewski took a deep dive into the history of impeachment ahead of the Senate trial for President Donald Trump. He found some pertinent parallels in a 1936 impeachment case of a federal judge from Florida that involved the House adding articles of impeachment after a Senate trial began.

Watch as he takes us through the weird rabbit hole he jumped down for this archived story.

GAO: Trump’s hold on Ukraine aid violated budget law
1974 budget law limits presidential authority to prohibit congressionally approved spending

President Donald Trump boards Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in October. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Government Accountability Office said in an opinion Thursday that President Donald Trump violated federal budget law when he ordered White House officials to withhold most of a $250 million military aid package for Ukraine last summer.

The finding comes after House Democrats delivered articles of impeachment on abuse of power and obstruction of Congress grounds stemming from the Ukraine affair to the Senate Wednesday evening, triggering the Senate trial expected to start next week.

Pelosi signs articles of impeachment

Speaker Nancy Pelosi gets up after signing the articles of impeachment during an engrossment ceremony Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Ink | On the Edge of Her Seat

Impeachment articles’ path to Senate governed by rules and precedent
Before trial starts, expect pomp, circumstance and ceremony

The articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton lie on the desk of Secretary of the Senate Gary Sisco on Dec. 19, 1998, after House Judiciary Chairman Henry J. Hyde delivered them from the House floor after the impeachment votes. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Correction appended Jan. 14, 2:10 p.m. | The expected House vote this week to name impeachment managers for the Senate trial and authorize them to spend House funds will set in motion a set of established steps that will guide the articles of impeachment from the House to the Senate.

The resolution, which won’t be released until Speaker Nancy Pelosi meets with her caucus Tuesday morning, will appoint managers who will act as prosecutors during the Senate trial that will determine whether the impeached President Donald Trump is removed from office. They will present the case for the House impeachment articles, approved in December, which charge the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Road Ahead: Impeachment trial imminent and war powers debate continues
Pelosi ready to send articles to Senate this week

Speaker Nancy Pelosi conducts her weekly news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Impeachment action is bound for the Senate this week, ending the long standoff between Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell over the framework of President Donald Trump’s trial. Pelosi intends to send the House’s articles of impeachment to the Senate and name impeachment managers, launching a trial that could begin before the week is out.

The impeachment articles, which the House approved in December, charge the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Capitol Ink | Fast Aging Baby New Year